Curriculum

Student Learning Outcomes

Physics field sessionEach BS Engineering Physics graduate will have:

  • an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering;
  • an ability to design and conduct experiments, and analyze and interpret data;
  • an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability;
  • an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams;
  • an ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems;
  • an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility;
  • an ability to communicate effectively;
  • the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context;
  • a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in lifelong learning;
  • a knowledge of contemporary issues;
  • an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Physics Program Educational Objectives

The BS Engineering Physics program prepares graduates who, based on factual knowledge and other skills necessary to construct an appropriate understanding of physical phenomena in applied contexts, will:

  • obtain a range of positions in industry or positions in government facilities or pursue graduate education in engineering, science, or related fields;
  • communicate and perform effectively within the criteria of their chosen careers;
  • engage in appropriate professional societies and continuing education activities;
  • participate ethically as professional members of the global society.

Undergraduate

Bachelor of Science in Engineering Physics
FRESHMAN YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH111
MATH111. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS111, (I, II, S) First course in the calculus sequence, including elements of plane geometry. Functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and their application. Definite and indefinite integrals; Prerequisite: precalculus. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.

Calculus for Scientists and Engineers I4.0
CHGN121
CHGN121. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II) Study of matter and energy based on atomic structure, correlation of properties of elements with position in periodic chart, chemical bonding, geometry of molecules, phase changes, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, gas laws, and thermochemistry. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-SC1.

Principles of Chemistry I4.0
LAIS100
HASS100. NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES. 4.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with LAIS100, Nature and Human Values will focus on diverse views and critical questions concerning traditional and contemporary issues linking the quality of human life and Nature, and their interdependence. The course will examine various disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches regarding two major questions: 1) How has Nature affected the quality of human life and the formulation of human values and ethics? (2) How have human actions, values, and ethics affected Nature? These issues will use cases and examples taken from across time and cultures. Themes will include but are not limited to population, natural resources, stewardship of the Earth, and the future of human society. This is a writing-intensive course that will provide instruction and practice in expository writing, using the disciplines and perspectives of the Humanities and Social Sciences. 4 hours lecture/seminar; 4 semester hours.
Nature and Human Values4.0
GEGN101 or
GEGN101. EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with SYGN101, (I, II, S) Fundamental concepts concerning the nature, composition and evolution of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere of the earth integrating the basic sciences of chemistry, physics, biology and mathematics. Understanding of anthropological interactions with the natural systems, and related discussions on cycling of energy and mass, global warming, natural hazards, land use, mitigation of environmental problems such as toxic waste disposal, exploitation and conservation of energy, mineral and agricultural resources, proper use of water resources, biodiversity and construction. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

CBEN110 or
CBEN110. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with BELS311,BIOL110, (I, II) Fundamentals of Biology with Laboratory I. This course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of biology and use illustrative examples and laboratory investigations that highlight the interface of biology with engineering. The focus will be on (1) the scientific method; (2) structural, molecular, and energetic basis of cellular activities; (3) mechanisms of storage and transfer of genetic information in biological organisms; (4) a laboratory 'toolbox' that will carry them forward in their laboratory-based courses. This core course in biology will be interdisciplinary in nature and will incorporate the major themes and mission of this school - earth, energy, and the environment. Lecture Hours: 3; Lab Hours: 3; Semester Hours: 4.

CSCI101***
CSCI101. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II) An introductory course to the building blocks of Computer Science. Topics include conventional computer hardware, data representation, the role of operating systems and networks in modern computing, algorithm design, privacy and information security, data science, artificial intelligence, and computer ethics. A popular procedural programming language will be learned by students and programming assignments will explore ideas in algorithm development, optimization, and data manipulation. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Earth and Environmental systems or
Fundamentals of Biology I or
Introduction to Computer Science
4.0
CSM101
CSM101. FRESHMAN SUCCESS SEMINAR. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. FIRST-YEAR ADVISING AND MENTORING PROGRAM is a "college transition" course, taught in small groups. Emphasis is placed on fostering connectedness to CSM, developing an appreciation of the value of a Mines education, and learning the techniques and University resources that will allow freshmen to develop to their fullest potential at CSM. Course Objectives: Become an integrated member of the CSM community; explore, select and connect with an academic major; and develop as a person and a student. 9 meetings during semester; 0.5 semester hours.

Success Seminar0.5
PAGN101
PAGN101. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) A general overview of life fitness basics which includes exposure to educational units of Nutrition, Stress Management, Drug and Alcohol Awareness. Instruction in Fitness units provides the student an opportunity for learning and the beginning basics for a healthy life style. 2 hours lab; 0.5 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL17.0
FRESHMAN YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH112
MATH112. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS112,MATH122, (I, II, S) Vectors, applications and techniques of integration, infinite series, and an introduction to multivariate functions and surfaces. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MATH111. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.

Calculus for Scientists and Engineers II4.0
CHGN122 or
CHGN122. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II (SC1). 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) Continuation of CHGN121 concentrating on chemical kinetics, gas laws, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and chemical equilibrium (acid- base, solubility, complexation, and redox). Laboratory experiments emphasizing quantitative chemical measurements. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CHGN121. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab, 4 semester hours.
CHGN125 *
CHGN125. MOLECULAR ENGINEERING & MATERIALS CHEMISTRY. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II) Studies of the interactions of matter and energy in chemical reactions and physical processes. Building on principles from CHGN121, the course systematically explores the relationships between processes, structures and properties, starting from the atomic and molecular level. It provides a framework to apply knowledge of chemical bonding and material properties to engineering design, with an emphasis on the Engineering Grand Challenges and the discovery of new process-structure-property relationships. There is a strong focus on the underlying principles of kinetics and equilibrium, and their general applicability, strongly rooted in the first and second law of thermodynamics. Examples of these principles come primarily from solid-state systems. Laboratory experiments emphasize conceptual understanding of structure-property relationships through both hands-on and computational analysis, reinforced by quantitative chemical measurements. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CHGN121. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
Principles of Chemistry II (CHGN 122) or Molecular Engineering and Materials Chemistry (CHGN125)4.0
PHGN100
PHGN100. PHYSICS I - MECHANICS. 4.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II,S) A first course in physics covering the basic principles of mechanics using vectors and calculus. The course consists of a fundamental treatment of the concepts and applications of kinematics and dynamics of particles and systems of particles, including Newton's laws, energy and momentum, rotation, oscillations, and waves. Prerequisite: MATH111. Co-requisites: MATH112 or MATH113 or MATH122. 2 hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-SC1.

Physics I Mechanics4.5
EPIC151
EDNS151. INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with EPIC151, (I, II, S) Introduction to Design teaches students how to solve open-ended problems in a hands-on manner using critical thinking and workplace skills. Students work in multidisciplinary teams to learn through doing, with emphasis on defining and diagnosing the problem through a holistic lens of technology, people and culture. Students follow a user-centered design methodology throughout the process, seeking to understand a problem from multiple perspectives before attempting to solve it. Students learn and apply specific skills throughout the semester, including: communication (written, oral, graphical), project management, concept visualization, critical thinking, effective teamwork, as well as building and iterating solutions. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Design I3.0
PAGN102
PAGN102. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Sections in physical fitness and team sports, relating to personal health and wellness activities. 2 hours lab; 0.5 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL16.0
SOPHOMORE YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH213
MATH213. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) Multivariable calculus, including partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.
Calculus for Scientists and Engineers III4.0
PHGN200
PHGN200. PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS. 4.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) Continuation of PHGN100. Introduction to the fundamental laws and concepts of electricity and magnetism, electromagnetic devices, electromagnetic behavior of materials, applications to simple circuits, electromagnetic radiation, and an introduction to optical phenomena. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or higher in PHGN100, concurrent enrollment in MATH213 or MATH214 or MATH223. 2 hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5 semester hours.
Physics II Electromagnetism and Optics4.5
EPIC269 ■√
EDNS269. EPICS II: ENGINEERING PHYSICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with EPIC269, (I) Design EPICS II builds on the design process introduced in Design EPICS I, and focuses on open-ended problem solving in which students use teamwork to develop computer software as a tool to solve problems related to engineering physics. Students will learn basic programming skills and apply them to projects that relate to current research and applications of physics. Projects are selected to represent real world physics problems wherein creative and critical thinking skills are necessary. These projects often involve computer-based optimization to obtain a solution. Students will learn how to analyze errors in data, and their effects on data interpretation and decision-making. Engineering Physics majors are encouraged to take this course in the sophomore year. It is open to other students on a space-available basis. Prerequisite: EDNS151, EDNS155, EDNS192, or HNRS115. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
EPICS II Engineering Physics3.0
LAIS200
HASS200. GLOBAL STUDIES. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with LAIS200,SYGN200, (I, II, S) Part of the Mines core curriculum, following the first-year requirement of HASS 100 (Nature and Human Values). Modern scientists and engineers operate in an increasingly interconnected world. This course is designed to enhance student capacity to understand, appreciate, and critically analyze the global contexts in which they will live and work. Course material examines the modern world through specific thematic lenses, with an emphasis on the major patterns of cultural, political, and/or environmental change. Students will develop original analysis through comparative empirical research on diverse societies and regions, and will communicate this analysis orally and in writing. Prerequisite: HASS100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Human Systems3.0
PAGN20X
Variable. https://catalog.mines.edu/coursesaz/physact/
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL15.0
SOPHOMORE YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH225/
MATH225. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS225,MACS315, (I, II, S) Classical techniques for first and higher order equations and systems of equations. Laplace transforms. Phase-plane and stability analysis of non-linear equations and systems. Applications from physics, mechanics, electrical engineering, and environmental sciences. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
235
MATH235. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS HONORS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS325, (II) Same topics as those covered in MATH225 but with additional material and problems. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Differential Equations3.0
MATH332/
MATH332. LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS332, (I, II) Systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants and eigenvalues. Linear operators. Abstract vector spaces. Applications selected from linear programming, physics, graph theory, and other fields. Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
342
MATH342. HONORS LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS.
Equivalent with MACS342, (II) Same topics as those covered in MATH332 but with additional material and problems as well as a more rigorous presentation. Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Linear Algebra3.0
PHGN215
PHGN215. ANALOG ELECTRONICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Introduction to analog devices used in modern electronics and basic topics in electrical engineering. Introduction to methods of electronics measurements, particularly the application of oscilloscopes and computer based data acquisition. Topics covered include circuit analysis, electrical power, diodes, transistors (FET and BJT), operational amplifiers, filters, transducers, and integrated circuits. Laboratory experiments in the use of basic electronics for physical measurements. Emphasis is on practical knowledge gained in the laboratory, including prototyping, troubleshooting, and laboratory notebook style. Prerequisite: PHGN200. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
Analog Circuits4.0
PHGN300/
PHGN300. PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS I. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with PHGN310, (I) Our technical world is filled with countless examples of modern physics. This course will discuss some historic experiments that led to the key discoveries, and the basic concepts, theories, and models behind some of our present day technologies. Topics may include special relativity, quantum physics, atomic and molecular physics, solid-state physics, semiconductor theory and devices, nuclear physics, particle physics and cosmology. Prerequisite: PHGN200; Concurrent enrollment in MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
310 **
PHGN310. HONORS PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with PHGN300, (II) The third course in introductory physics with in depth discussion on special relativity, wave-particle duality, the Schroedinger equation, electrons in solids, quantum tunneling, nuclear structure and transmutations. Registration is strongly recommended for declared physics majors and those considering majoring or minoring in physics. Prerequisite: PHGN200; Concurrent enrollment in MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Modern Physics I3.0
CSCI250
CSCI250. PYTHON-BASED COMPUTING: BUILDING A SENSOR SYSTEM. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) This course will teach students the skills needed for data collection, analysis, and visualization on a small embedded device (e.g., Raspberry Pi). Students will learn basic Linux, Python, and the programming skills needed to control the hardware and associated sensors. This hands-on course includes a baseline project, four introductory projects (e.g., acoustic, acceleration, magnetic field, optical), and a final Capstone project. The Capstone project will have students create their own application using the techniques learned during the first half of the semester; students will then present their Capstone project through a formal presentation, write-up, and demonstration. We suggest the student take "Introduction to Computer Science" before this course. Co-requisites: MATH213, PHGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Python-Based Computing3.0
PAGN20X
Variable. https://catalog.mines.edu/coursesaz/physact/
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL16.5
SUMMER FIELD SESSION
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN384
PHGN384. FIELD SESSION TECHNIQUES IN PHYSICS. 1-6 SEMESTER HR.
(S) Introduction to the design and fabrication of engineering physics apparatus. Intensive individual participation in the design of machined system components, vacuum systems, electronics, optics, and application of computer interfacing systems and computational tools. Supplementary lectures on safety, laboratory techniques and professional development. Visits to regional research facilities and industrial plants. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310, PHGN215, CSCI250. 6 semester hours.
Summer Field Session6.0
TOTAL6.0
JUNIOR YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN311
PHGN311. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Demonstration of the unity of diverse topics such as mechanics, quantum mechanics, optics, and electricity and magnetism via the techniques of linear algebra, complex variables, Fourier transforms, and vector calculus. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310, MATH225, MATH332, and CSCI250. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Introduction to Mathematical Physics3.0
PHGN315
PHGN315. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB I. 2.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) Introduction to laboratory measurement techniques as applied to modern physics experiments. Experiments from optics and atomic physics. A writing-intensive course with laboratory and computer design projects based on applications of modern physics. Prerequisite: PHGN300/310, PHGN384. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
Advanced Lab I2.0
PHGN317
PHGN317. SEMICONDUCTOR CIRCUITS- DIGITAL. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Introduction to digital devices used in modern electronics. Topics covered include logic gates, flip-flops, timers, counters, multiplexing, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog devices. Emphasis is on practical circuit design and assembly. Prerequisite: PHGN215 and CSCI250. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Digital Circuits3.0
PHGN350
PHGN350. INTERMEDIATE MECHANICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Begins with an intermediate treatment of Newtonian mechanics and continues through an introduction to Hamilton's principle and Hamiltonian and Lagrangian dynamics. Includes systems of particles, linear and driven oscillators, motion under a central force, two-particle collisions and scattering, motion in non-inertial reference frames and dynamics of rigid bodies.Prerequisite:PHGN200. Corequisite: PHGN311. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
Intermediate Mechanics4.0
HASS Elective I3.0
TOTAL15.0
JUNIOR YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN320
PHGN320. MODERN PHYSICS II: BASICS OF QUANTUM MECHANICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Introduction to the Schroedinger theory of quantum mechanics. Topics include Schroedinger's equation, quantum theory of measurement, the uncertainty principle, eigenfunctions and energy spectra, anular momentum, perturbation theory, and the treatment of identical particles. Example applications taken from atomic, molecular, solid state or nuclear systems. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310 and PHGN311. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
Modern Physics II4.0
PHGN326
PHGN326. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB II. 2.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN315. A writing-intensive course which expands laboratory experiments to include nuclear and solid state physics. Prerequisite: PHGN315. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
Advanced Lab II2.0
PHGN341
PHGN341. THERMAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) An introduction to statistical physics from the quantum mechanical point of view. The microcanonical and canonical ensembles. Heat, work and the laws of thermodynamics. Thermodynamic potentials; Maxwell relations; phase transformations. Elementary kinetic theory. An introduction to quantum statistics. Prerequisite: CHGN122 or CHGN125 and PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Thermal Physics3.0
PHGN361
PHGN361. INTERMEDIATE ELECTROMAGNETISM. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Theory and application of the following: static electric and magnetic fields in free space, dielectric materials, and magnetic materials; steady currents; scalar and vector potentials; Gauss' law and Laplace's equation applied to boundary value problems; Ampere's and Faraday's laws. Prerequisite: PHGN200 and PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Intermediate Electromagnetism3.0
EBGN201
EBGN201. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II,S) Introduction to microeconomics and macroeconomics. This course focuses on applying the economic way of thinking and basic tools of economic analysis. Economic effects of public policies. Analysis of markets for goods, services and resources. Tools of cost-benefit analysis. Measures of overall economic activity. Determinants of economic growth. Monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisites: None. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Principles of Economics3.0
TOTAL15.0
SENIOR YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN471
PHGN471. SENIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES I. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) The first of a two semester sequence covering the principles of project design. Class sessions cover effective team organization, project planning, time management, literature research methods, record keeping, fundamentals of technical writing, professional ethics, project funding and intellectual property. Prerequisites: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisites: PHGN481 or PHGN491. 1 hour lecture in 7 class sessions; 0.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Principles0.5
PHGN481 △√
PHGN481. SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE. 2.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) The first of a two semester program covering the full spectrum of project design, drawing on all of the student's previous course work. At the beginning of the first semester, the student selects a research project in consultation with the Senior Design Oversight Committee (SDOC) and the Project Mentor. The objectives of the project are given to the student in broad outline form. The student then designs the entire project, including any or all of the following elements as appropriate: literature search, specialized apparatus or algorithms, block-diagram electronics, computer data acquisition and/or analysis, sample materials, and measurement and/or analysis sequences. The course culminates in a formal interim written report. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN471. 6 hour lab; 2.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Practice2.5
PHGN462
PHGN462. ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES AND OPTICAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Solutions to the electromagnetic wave equation are studied, including plane waves, guided waves, refraction, interference, diffraction and polarization; applications in optics; imaging, lasers, resonators and wave guides. Prerequisite: PHGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Electromagnetic Waves and Optical Physics3.0
HASS Elective II3.0
Free Elective I3.0
Free Elective II3.0
TOTAL15.0
SENIOR YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN472
PHGN472. SENIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES II. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN471. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN482 or PHGN492. 1 hour lecture in 7 class sessions; 0.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Principles0.5
PHGN482 △√
PHGN482. SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE. 2.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN481. The course culminates in a formal written report and poster. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN472. 6 hour lab; 2.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Practice2.5
Engineering Topics Elective3.0
HASS Elective III3.0
Free Elective III3.0
Free Elective IV3.0
TOTAL15.0
GRAND TOTAL130.5
* Nuclear Engineering Combined students should take CHGN122.
** The Physics Department recommends taking PHGN310.
*** CSCI101 is only 3 credits. Students taking this course must take at least one additional credit to meet total credit hour requirements.
■ Any flavor of EPICS II is allowed for Physics. EPIC269 is offered only in the Fall.
√ Significant design
△ Honors courses PHGN 491/492 may be substituted with the instructor's consent.

PDF version

 

Combined BS/MS Programs

 

BS Engineering Physics / MS Applied Math and Statistics
FRESHMAN YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH111
MATH111. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS111, (I, II, S) First course in the calculus sequence, including elements of plane geometry. Functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and their application. Definite and indefinite integrals; Prerequisite: precalculus. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.

Calculus for Scientists and Engineers I4.0
CHGN121
CHGN121. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II) Study of matter and energy based on atomic structure, correlation of properties of elements with position in periodic chart, chemical bonding, geometry of molecules, phase changes, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, gas laws, and thermochemistry. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-SC1.

Principles of Chemistry I4.0
LAIS100
HASS100. NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES. 4.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with LAIS100, Nature and Human Values will focus on diverse views and critical questions concerning traditional and contemporary issues linking the quality of human life and Nature, and their interdependence. The course will examine various disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches regarding two major questions: 1) How has Nature affected the quality of human life and the formulation of human values and ethics? (2) How have human actions, values, and ethics affected Nature? These issues will use cases and examples taken from across time and cultures. Themes will include but are not limited to population, natural resources, stewardship of the Earth, and the future of human society. This is a writing-intensive course that will provide instruction and practice in expository writing, using the disciplines and perspectives of the Humanities and Social Sciences. 4 hours lecture/seminar; 4 semester hours.
Nature and Human Values4.0
GEGN101 or
GEGN101. EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with SYGN101, (I, II, S) Fundamental concepts concerning the nature, composition and evolution of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere of the earth integrating the basic sciences of chemistry, physics, biology and mathematics. Understanding of anthropological interactions with the natural systems, and related discussions on cycling of energy and mass, global warming, natural hazards, land use, mitigation of environmental problems such as toxic waste disposal, exploitation and conservation of energy, mineral and agricultural resources, proper use of water resources, biodiversity and construction. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

CBEN110 or
CBEN110. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with BELS311,BIOL110, (I, II) Fundamentals of Biology with Laboratory I. This course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of biology and use illustrative examples and laboratory investigations that highlight the interface of biology with engineering. The focus will be on (1) the scientific method; (2) structural, molecular, and energetic basis of cellular activities; (3) mechanisms of storage and transfer of genetic information in biological organisms; (4) a laboratory 'toolbox' that will carry them forward in their laboratory-based courses. This core course in biology will be interdisciplinary in nature and will incorporate the major themes and mission of this school - earth, energy, and the environment. Lecture Hours: 3; Lab Hours: 3; Semester Hours: 4.

CSCI101***
CSCI101. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II) An introductory course to the building blocks of Computer Science. Topics include conventional computer hardware, data representation, the role of operating systems and networks in modern computing, algorithm design, privacy and information security, data science, artificial intelligence, and computer ethics. A popular procedural programming language will be learned by students and programming assignments will explore ideas in algorithm development, optimization, and data manipulation. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Earth and Environmental Systems or
Fundamentals of Biology I or
Introduction to Computer Science
4.0
CSM101
CSM101. FRESHMAN SUCCESS SEMINAR. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. FIRST-YEAR ADVISING AND MENTORING PROGRAM is a "college transition" course, taught in small groups. Emphasis is placed on fostering connectedness to CSM, developing an appreciation of the value of a Mines education, and learning the techniques and University resources that will allow freshmen to develop to their fullest potential at CSM. Course Objectives: Become an integrated member of the CSM community; explore, select and connect with an academic major; and develop as a person and a student. 9 meetings during semester; 0.5 semester hours.

Success Seminar0.5
PAGN101
PAGN101. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) A general overview of life fitness basics which includes exposure to educational units of Nutrition, Stress Management, Drug and Alcohol Awareness. Instruction in Fitness units provides the student an opportunity for learning and the beginning basics for a healthy life style. 2 hours lab; 0.5 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.

Physical Education0.5
TOTAL17.0
FRESHMAN YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH112
MATH112. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS112,MATH122, (I, II, S) Vectors, applications and techniques of integration, infinite series, and an introduction to multivariate functions and surfaces. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MATH111. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.

Calculus for Scientists and Engineers Calculus II4.0
CHGN125
CHGN125. MOLECULAR ENGINEERING & MATERIALS CHEMISTRY. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II) Studies of the interactions of matter and energy in chemical reactions and physical processes. Building on principles from CHGN121, the course systematically explores the relationships between processes, structures and properties, starting from the atomic and molecular level. It provides a framework to apply knowledge of chemical bonding and material properties to engineering design, with an emphasis on the Engineering Grand Challenges and the discovery of new process-structure-property relationships. There is a strong focus on the underlying principles of kinetics and equilibrium, and their general applicability, strongly rooted in the first and second law of thermodynamics. Examples of these principles come primarily from solid-state systems. Laboratory experiments emphasize conceptual understanding of structure-property relationships through both hands-on and computational analysis, reinforced by quantitative chemical measurements. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CHGN121. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

Molecular Engineering and Materials Chemistry 4.0
PHGN100
PHGN100. PHYSICS I - MECHANICS. 4.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II,S) A first course in physics covering the basic principles of mechanics using vectors and calculus. The course consists of a fundamental treatment of the concepts and applications of kinematics and dynamics of particles and systems of particles, including Newton's laws, energy and momentum, rotation, oscillations, and waves. Prerequisite: MATH111. Co-requisites: MATH112 or MATH113 or MATH122. 2 hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-SC1.

Physics I Mechanics4.5
EPIC151
EDNS151. INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with EPIC151, (I, II, S) Introduction to Design teaches students how to solve open-ended problems in a hands-on manner using critical thinking and workplace skills. Students work in multidisciplinary teams to learn through doing, with emphasis on defining and diagnosing the problem through a holistic lens of technology, people and culture. Students follow a user-centered design methodology throughout the process, seeking to understand a problem from multiple perspectives before attempting to solve it. Students learn and apply specific skills throughout the semester, including: communication (written, oral, graphical), project management, concept visualization, critical thinking, effective teamwork, as well as building and iterating solutions. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

Design I3.0
PAGN102
PAGN102. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Sections in physical fitness and team sports, relating to personal health and wellness activities. 2 hours lab; 0.5 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL16.0
SOPHOMORE YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH213
MATH213. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) Multivariable calculus, including partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.

Calculus for Scientists and Engineers Calculus III4.0
PHGN200
PHGN200. PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS. 4.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) Continuation of PHGN100. Introduction to the fundamental laws and concepts of electricity and magnetism, electromagnetic devices, electromagnetic behavior of materials, applications to simple circuits, electromagnetic radiation, and an introduction to optical phenomena. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or higher in PHGN100, concurrent enrollment in MATH213 or MATH214 or MATH223. 2 hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5 semester hours.
Physics II Electromagnetism and Optics4.5
EPIC269 ■√
EDNS269. EPICS II: ENGINEERING PHYSICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with EPIC269, (I) Design EPICS II builds on the design process introduced in Design EPICS I, and focuses on open-ended problem solving in which students use teamwork to develop computer software as a tool to solve problems related to engineering physics. Students will learn basic programming skills and apply them to projects that relate to current research and applications of physics. Projects are selected to represent real world physics problems wherein creative and critical thinking skills are necessary. These projects often involve computer-based optimization to obtain a solution. Students will learn how to analyze errors in data, and their effects on data interpretation and decision-making. Engineering Physics majors are encouraged to take this course in the sophomore year. It is open to other students on a space-available basis. Prerequisite: EDNS151, EDNS155, EDNS192, or HNRS115. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
EPICS II Engineering Physics3.0
CSCI261 ****
CSCI261. PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS261, (I, II) This course introduces fundamental computer programming concepts using a high-level language and a modern development environment. Programming skills include sequential, selection, and repetition control structures, functions, input and output, primitive data types, basic data structures including arrays and pointers, objects, and classes. Software engineering skills include problem solving, program design, and debugging practices. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

C++/Java3.0
PAGN20X
Variable. https://catalog.mines.edu/coursesaz/physact/
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL15.0
SOPHOMORE YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH225/
MATH225. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS.
Equivalent with MACS225,MACS315, (I, II, S) Classical techniques for first and higher order equations and systems of equations. Laplace transforms. Phase-plane and stability analysis of non-linear equations and systems. Applications from physics, mechanics, electrical engineering, and environmental sciences. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
235
MATH235. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS HONORS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS.
Equivalent with MACS325, (II) Same topics as those covered in MATH225 but with additional material and problems. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Differential Equations3.0
MATH332/
MATH332. LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS332, (I, II) Systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants and eigenvalues. Linear operators. Abstract vector spaces. Applications selected from linear programming, physics, graph theory, and other fields. Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
342
MATH342. HONORS LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS.
Equivalent with MACS342, (II) Same topics as those covered in MATH332 but with additional material and problems as well as a more rigorous presentation. Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Linear Algebra3.0
PHGN215
PHGN215. ANALOG ELECTRONICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Introduction to analog devices used in modern electronics and basic topics in electrical engineering. Introduction to methods of electronics measurements, particularly the application of oscilloscopes and computer based data acquisition. Topics covered include circuit analysis, electrical power, diodes, transistors (FET and BJT), operational amplifiers, filters, transducers, and integrated circuits. Laboratory experiments in the use of basic electronics for physical measurements. Emphasis is on practical knowledge gained in the laboratory, including prototyping, troubleshooting, and laboratory notebook style. Prerequisite: PHGN200. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

Analog Circuits4.0
PHGN300/
PHGN300. PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS I. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with PHGN310, (I) Our technical world is filled with countless examples of modern physics. This course will discuss some historic experiments that led to the key discoveries, and the basic concepts, theories, and models behind some of our present day technologies. Topics may include special relativity, quantum physics, atomic and molecular physics, solid-state physics, semiconductor theory and devices, nuclear physics, particle physics and cosmology. Prerequisite: PHGN200; Concurrent enrollment in MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
310 **
PHGN310. HONORS PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with PHGN300, (II) The third course in introductory physics with in depth discussion on special relativity, wave-particle duality, the Schroedinger equation, electrons in solids, quantum tunneling, nuclear structure and transmutations. Registration is strongly recommended for declared physics majors and those considering majoring or minoring in physics. Prerequisite: PHGN200; Concurrent enrollment in MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Modern Physics I3.0
CSCI250
CSCI250. PYTHON-BASED COMPUTING: BUILDING A SENSOR SYSTEM. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) This course will teach students the skills needed for data collection, analysis, and visualization on a small embedded device (e.g., Raspberry Pi). Students will learn basic Linux, Python, and the programming skills needed to control the hardware and associated sensors. This hands-on course includes a baseline project, four introductory projects (e.g., acoustic, acceleration, magnetic field, optical), and a final Capstone project. The Capstone project will have students create their own application using the techniques learned during the first half of the semester; students will then present their Capstone project through a formal presentation, write-up, and demonstration. We suggest the student take "Introduction to Computer Science" before this course. Co-requisites: MATH213, PHGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Python-Based Computing3.0
PAGN20X
Variable. https://catalog.mines.edu/coursesaz/physact/
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL16.5
SUMMER FIELD SESSION
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN384
PHGN384. FIELD SESSION TECHNIQUES IN PHYSICS. 1-6 SEMESTER HR.
(S) Introduction to the design and fabrication of engineering physics apparatus. Intensive individual participation in the design of machined system components, vacuum systems, electronics, optics, and application of computer interfacing systems and computational tools. Supplementary lectures on safety, laboratory techniques and professional development. Visits to regional research facilities and industrial plants. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310, PHGN215, CSCI250. 6 semester hours.

Summer Field Session6.0
TOTAL6.0
JUNIOR YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN311
PHGN311. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Demonstration of the unity of diverse topics such as mechanics, quantum mechanics, optics, and electricity and magnetism via the techniques of linear algebra, complex variables, Fourier transforms, and vector calculus. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310, MATH225, MATH332, and CSCI250. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Introduction to Mathematical Physics3.0
PHGN315
PHGN315. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB I. 2.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) Introduction to laboratory measurement techniques as applied to modern physics experiments. Experiments from optics and atomic physics. A writing-intensive course with laboratory and computer design projects based on applications of modern physics. Prerequisite: PHGN300/310, PHGN384. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.

Advanced Lab I2.0
PHGN317
PHGN317. SEMICONDUCTOR CIRCUITS- DIGITAL. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Introduction to digital devices used in modern electronics. Topics covered include logic gates, flip-flops, timers, counters, multiplexing, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog devices. Emphasis is on practical circuit design and assembly. Prerequisite: PHGN215 and CSCI250. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

Digital Circuits3.0
PHGN350
PHGN350. INTERMEDIATE MECHANICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Begins with an intermediate treatment of Newtonian mechanics and continues through an introduction to Hamilton's principle and Hamiltonian and Lagrangian dynamics. Includes systems of particles, linear and driven oscillators, motion under a central force, two-particle collisions and scattering, motion in non-inertial reference frames and dynamics of rigid bodies.Prerequisite:PHGN200. Corequisite: PHGN311. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
Intermediate Mechanics4.0
MATH307
MATH307. INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with CSCI407,MATH407, (I, II, S) This course is designed to introduce scientific computing to scientists and engineers. Students in this course will be taught various numerical methods and programming techniques to solve basic scientific problems. Emphasis will be made on implementation of various numerical and approximation methods to efficiently simulate several applied mathematical models. Prerequisites: MATH213 or MATH223 or MATH224. Co-requisites: MATH225 or MATH235. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Introduction to Scientific Computing3.0
TOTAL15.0
JUNIOR YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN320
PHGN320. MODERN PHYSICS II: BASICS OF QUANTUM MECHANICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Introduction to the Schroedinger theory of quantum mechanics. Topics include Schroedinger's equation, quantum theory of measurement, the uncertainty principle, eigenfunctions and energy spectra, anular momentum, perturbation theory, and the treatment of identical particles. Example applications taken from atomic, molecular, solid state or nuclear systems. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310 and PHGN311. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
Modern Physics II4.0
PHGN326
PHGN326. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB II. 2.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN315. A writing-intensive course which expands laboratory experiments to include nuclear and solid state physics. Prerequisite: PHGN315. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
Advanced Lab II2.0
PHGN341
PHGN341. THERMAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) An introduction to statistical physics from the quantum mechanical point of view. The microcanonical and canonical ensembles. Heat, work and the laws of thermodynamics. Thermodynamic potentials; Maxwell relations; phase transformations. Elementary kinetic theory. An introduction to quantum statistics. Prerequisite: CHGN122 or CHGN125 and PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Thermal Physics3.0
PHGN361
PHGN361. INTERMEDIATE ELECTROMAGNETISM. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Theory and application of the following: static electric and magnetic fields in free space, dielectric materials, and magnetic materials; steady currents; scalar and vector potentials; Gauss' law and Laplace's equation applied to boundary value problems; Ampere's and Faraday's laws. Prerequisite: PHGN200 and PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Intermediate Electromagnetism3.0
LAIS200
HASS200. GLOBAL STUDIES. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with LAIS200,SYGN200, (I, II, S) Part of the Mines core curriculum, following the first-year requirement of HASS 100 (Nature and Human Values). Modern scientists and engineers operate in an increasingly interconnected world. This course is designed to enhance student capacity to understand, appreciate, and critically analyze the global contexts in which they will live and work. Course material examines the modern world through specific thematic lenses, with an emphasis on the major patterns of cultural, political, and/or environmental change. Students will develop original analysis through comparative empirical research on diverse societies and regions, and will communicate this analysis orally and in writing. Prerequisite: HASS100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Human Systems3.0
TOTAL15.0
SENIOR YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN471
PHGN471. SENIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES I. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) The first of a two semester sequence covering the principles of project design. Class sessions cover effective team organization, project planning, time management, literature research methods, record keeping, fundamentals of technical writing, professional ethics, project funding and intellectual property. Prerequisites: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisites: PHGN481 or PHGN491. 1 hour lecture in 7 class sessions; 0.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Principles0.5
PHGN481 △√
PHGN481. SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE. 2.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) The first of a two semester program covering the full spectrum of project design, drawing on all of the student's previous course work. At the beginning of the first semester, the student selects a research project in consultation with the Senior Design Oversight Committee (SDOC) and the Project Mentor. The objectives of the project are given to the student in broad outline form. The student then designs the entire project, including any or all of the following elements as appropriate: literature search, specialized apparatus or algorithms, block-diagram electronics, computer data acquisition and/or analysis, sample materials, and measurement and/or analysis sequences. The course culminates in a formal interim written report. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN471. 6 hour lab; 2.5 semester hours.

Senior Design Practice2.5
PHGN462
PHGN462. ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES AND OPTICAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Solutions to the electromagnetic wave equation are studied, including plane waves, guided waves, refraction, interference, diffraction and polarization; applications in optics; imaging, lasers, resonators and wave guides. Prerequisite: PHGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Electromagnetic Waves and Optical Physics3.0
HASS Elective I3.0
MATH301
MATH301. INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MATH401, (II) This course is a first course in real analysis that lays out the context and motivation of analysis in terms of the transition from power series to those less predictable series. The course is taught from a historical perspective. It covers an introduction to the real numbers, sequences and series and their convergence, real-valued functions and their continuity and differentiability, sequences of functions and their pointwise and uniform convergence, and Riemann-Stieltjes integration theory. Prerequisite: MATH300. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Introduction to Analysis3.0
MATH440
MATH440. PARALLEL SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with CSCI440, (I) This course is designed to facilitate students' learning of parallel programming techniques to efficiently simulate various complex processes modeled by mathematical equations using multiple and multi-core processors. Emphasis will be placed on implementation of various scientific computing algorithms in FORTRAN 90 and its variants using MPI and OpenMP. Prerequisites: MATH307 or CSCI407. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Parallel Scientific Computing3.0
TOTAL15.0
SENIOR YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN472
PHGN472. SENIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES II. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN471. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN482 or PHGN492. 1 hour lecture in 7 class sessions; 0.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Principles0.5
PHGN482 △√
PHGN482. SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE. 2.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN481. The course culminates in a formal written report and poster. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN472. 6 hour lab; 2.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Practice2.5
MATH484
MATH484. MATHEMATICAL AND COMPUTATIONAL MODELING (CAPSTONE). 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) This is the capstone course in the Computational and Applied Mathematics option. Students will apply computational and applied mathematics modeling techniques to solve complex problems in biological, engineering and physical systems. Mathematical methods and algorithms will be studied within both theoretical and computational contexts. The emphasis is on how to formulate, analyze and use nonlinear modeling to solve typical modern problems. Prerequisites: MATH331, MATH307, and MATH455. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Mathematical and Computational Modeling3.0
EBGN201
EBGN201. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II,S) Introduction to microeconomics and macroeconomics. This course focuses on applying the economic way of thinking and basic tools of economic analysis. Economic effects of public policies. Analysis of markets for goods, services and resources. Tools of cost-benefit analysis. Measures of overall economic activity. Determinants of economic growth. Monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisites: None. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Principles of Economics3.0
HASS Elective II3.0
HASS Elective III3.0
TOTAL15.0
GRAND TOTAL130.5
** The Physics Department recommends taking PHGN310.
*** CSCI101 is only 3 credits. Students taking this course must take at least one additional credit to meet total credit hour requirements.
**** Alternatively, C++/Java may be taken in the summer after the freshman or sophomore years.
■ Any flavor of EPICS II is allowed for Physics. EPIC269 is offered only in the Fall.
√ Significant design
△ Honors courses PHGN491/492 may be substituted with the instructor's consent.
◇ These courses are double counted. They count for both the BS and MS degrees.

PDF version

BS Engineering Physics / MS Physics
FRESHMAN YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH111
MATH111. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS111, (I, II, S) First course in the calculus sequence, including elements of plane geometry. Functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and their application. Definite and indefinite integrals; Prerequisite: precalculus. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.

Calculus for Scientists and Engineers I4.0
CHGN121
CHGN121. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II) Study of matter and energy based on atomic structure, correlation of properties of elements with position in periodic chart, chemical bonding, geometry of molecules, phase changes, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, gas laws, and thermochemistry. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-SC1.
Principles of Chemistry I4.0
LAIS100
HASS100. NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES. 4.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with LAIS100, Nature and Human Values will focus on diverse views and critical questions concerning traditional and contemporary issues linking the quality of human life and Nature, and their interdependence. The course will examine various disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches regarding two major questions: 1) How has Nature affected the quality of human life and the formulation of human values and ethics? (2) How have human actions, values, and ethics affected Nature? These issues will use cases and examples taken from across time and cultures. Themes will include but are not limited to population, natural resources, stewardship of the Earth, and the future of human society. This is a writing-intensive course that will provide instruction and practice in expository writing, using the disciplines and perspectives of the Humanities and Social Sciences. 4 hours lecture/seminar; 4 semester hours.
Nature and Human Values4.0
GEGN101 or
GEGN101. EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with SYGN101, (I, II, S) Fundamental concepts concerning the nature, composition and evolution of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere of the earth integrating the basic sciences of chemistry, physics, biology and mathematics. Understanding of anthropological interactions with the natural systems, and related discussions on cycling of energy and mass, global warming, natural hazards, land use, mitigation of environmental problems such as toxic waste disposal, exploitation and conservation of energy, mineral and agricultural resources, proper use of water resources, biodiversity and construction. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

CBEN110 or
CBEN110. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with BELS311,BIOL110, (I, II) Fundamentals of Biology with Laboratory I. This course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of biology and use illustrative examples and laboratory investigations that highlight the interface of biology with engineering. The focus will be on (1) the scientific method; (2) structural, molecular, and energetic basis of cellular activities; (3) mechanisms of storage and transfer of genetic information in biological organisms; (4) a laboratory 'toolbox' that will carry them forward in their laboratory-based courses. This core course in biology will be interdisciplinary in nature and will incorporate the major themes and mission of this school - earth, energy, and the environment. Lecture Hours: 3; Lab Hours: 3; Semester Hours: 4.

CSCI101***
CSCI101. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II) An introductory course to the building blocks of Computer Science. Topics include conventional computer hardware, data representation, the role of operating systems and networks in modern computing, algorithm design, privacy and information security, data science, artificial intelligence, and computer ethics. A popular procedural programming language will be learned by students and programming assignments will explore ideas in algorithm development, optimization, and data manipulation. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Earth and Environmental Systems or
Fundamentals of Biology I or
Introduction to Computer Science
4.0
CSM101
CSM101. FRESHMAN SUCCESS SEMINAR. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. FIRST-YEAR ADVISING AND MENTORING PROGRAM is a "college transition" course, taught in small groups. Emphasis is placed on fostering connectedness to CSM, developing an appreciation of the value of a Mines education, and learning the techniques and University resources that will allow freshmen to develop to their fullest potential at CSM. Course Objectives: Become an integrated member of the CSM community; explore, select and connect with an academic major; and develop as a person and a student. 9 meetings during semester; 0.5 semester hours.

Success Seminar0.5
PAGN101
PAGN101. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) A general overview of life fitness basics which includes exposure to educational units of Nutrition, Stress Management, Drug and Alcohol Awareness. Instruction in Fitness units provides the student an opportunity for learning and the beginning basics for a healthy life style. 2 hours lab; 0.5 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.

Physical Education0.5
TOTAL17.0
FRESHMAN YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH112
MATH112. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS112,MATH122, (I, II, S) Vectors, applications and techniques of integration, infinite series, and an introduction to multivariate functions and surfaces. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MATH111. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.

Calculus for Scientists and Engineers Calculus II4.0
CHGN125
CHGN125. MOLECULAR ENGINEERING & MATERIALS CHEMISTRY. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II) Studies of the interactions of matter and energy in chemical reactions and physical processes. Building on principles from CHGN121, the course systematically explores the relationships between processes, structures and properties, starting from the atomic and molecular level. It provides a framework to apply knowledge of chemical bonding and material properties to engineering design, with an emphasis on the Engineering Grand Challenges and the discovery of new process-structure-property relationships. There is a strong focus on the underlying principles of kinetics and equilibrium, and their general applicability, strongly rooted in the first and second law of thermodynamics. Examples of these principles come primarily from solid-state systems. Laboratory experiments emphasize conceptual understanding of structure-property relationships through both hands-on and computational analysis, reinforced by quantitative chemical measurements. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CHGN121. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

Molecular Engineering and Materials Chemistry 4.0
PHGN100
PHGN100. PHYSICS I - MECHANICS. 4.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II,S) A first course in physics covering the basic principles of mechanics using vectors and calculus. The course consists of a fundamental treatment of the concepts and applications of kinematics and dynamics of particles and systems of particles, including Newton's laws, energy and momentum, rotation, oscillations, and waves. Prerequisite: MATH111. Co-requisites: MATH112 or MATH113 or MATH122. 2 hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-SC1.

Physics I Mechanics4.5
EPIC151
EDNS151. INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with EPIC151, (I, II, S) Introduction to Design teaches students how to solve open-ended problems in a hands-on manner using critical thinking and workplace skills. Students work in multidisciplinary teams to learn through doing, with emphasis on defining and diagnosing the problem through a holistic lens of technology, people and culture. Students follow a user-centered design methodology throughout the process, seeking to understand a problem from multiple perspectives before attempting to solve it. Students learn and apply specific skills throughout the semester, including: communication (written, oral, graphical), project management, concept visualization, critical thinking, effective teamwork, as well as building and iterating solutions. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

Design I3.0
PAGN102
PAGN102. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Sections in physical fitness and team sports, relating to personal health and wellness activities. 2 hours lab; 0.5 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.

Physical Education0.5
TOTAL16.0
SOPHOMORE YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH213
MATH213. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) Multivariable calculus, including partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.
Calculus for Scientists and Engineers Calculus III4.0
PHGN200
PHGN200. PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS. 4.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) Continuation of PHGN100. Introduction to the fundamental laws and concepts of electricity and magnetism, electromagnetic devices, electromagnetic behavior of materials, applications to simple circuits, electromagnetic radiation, and an introduction to optical phenomena. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or higher in PHGN100, concurrent enrollment in MATH213 or MATH214 or MATH223. 2 hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5 semester hours.
Physics II Electromagnetism and Optics4.5
EPIC269 ■√
EDNS269. EPICS II: ENGINEERING PHYSICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with EPIC269, (I) Design EPICS II builds on the design process introduced in Design EPICS I, and focuses on open-ended problem solving in which students use teamwork to develop computer software as a tool to solve problems related to engineering physics. Students will learn basic programming skills and apply them to projects that relate to current research and applications of physics. Projects are selected to represent real world physics problems wherein creative and critical thinking skills are necessary. These projects often involve computer-based optimization to obtain a solution. Students will learn how to analyze errors in data, and their effects on data interpretation and decision-making. Engineering Physics majors are encouraged to take this course in the sophomore year. It is open to other students on a space-available basis. Prerequisite: EDNS151, EDNS155, EDNS192, or HNRS115. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

EPICS II Engineering Physics3.0
LAIS200
HASS200. GLOBAL STUDIES. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with LAIS200,SYGN200, (I, II, S) Part of the Mines core curriculum, following the first-year requirement of HASS 100 (Nature and Human Values). Modern scientists and engineers operate in an increasingly interconnected world. This course is designed to enhance student capacity to understand, appreciate, and critically analyze the global contexts in which they will live and work. Course material examines the modern world through specific thematic lenses, with an emphasis on the major patterns of cultural, political, and/or environmental change. Students will develop original analysis through comparative empirical research on diverse societies and regions, and will communicate this analysis orally and in writing. Prerequisite: HASS100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Human Systems3.0
PAGN20X
Variable. https://catalog.mines.edu/coursesaz/physact/
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL15.0
SOPHOMORE YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH225/
MATH225. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS225,MACS315, (I, II, S) Classical techniques for first and higher order equations and systems of equations. Laplace transforms. Phase-plane and stability analysis of non-linear equations and systems. Applications from physics, mechanics, electrical engineering, and environmental sciences. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
235
MATH235. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS HONORS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS325, (II) Same topics as those covered in MATH225 but with additional material and problems. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Differential Equations3.0
MATH332/
MATH332. LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS332, (I, II) Systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants and eigenvalues. Linear operators. Abstract vector spaces. Applications selected from linear programming, physics, graph theory, and other fields. Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
342
MATH342. HONORS LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS342, (II) Same topics as those covered in MATH332 but with additional material and problems as well as a more rigorous presentation. Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Linear Algebra3.0
PHGN215
PHGN215. ANALOG ELECTRONICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Introduction to analog devices used in modern electronics and basic topics in electrical engineering. Introduction to methods of electronics measurements, particularly the application of oscilloscopes and computer based data acquisition. Topics covered include circuit analysis, electrical power, diodes, transistors (FET and BJT), operational amplifiers, filters, transducers, and integrated circuits. Laboratory experiments in the use of basic electronics for physical measurements. Emphasis is on practical knowledge gained in the laboratory, including prototyping, troubleshooting, and laboratory notebook style. Prerequisite: PHGN200. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
Analog Circuits4.0
PHGN300/
PHGN300. PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS I. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with PHGN310, (I) Our technical world is filled with countless examples of modern physics. This course will discuss some historic experiments that led to the key discoveries, and the basic concepts, theories, and models behind some of our present day technologies. Topics may include special relativity, quantum physics, atomic and molecular physics, solid-state physics, semiconductor theory and devices, nuclear physics, particle physics and cosmology. Prerequisite: PHGN200; Concurrent enrollment in MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
310 **
PHGN310. HONORS PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with PHGN300, (II) The third course in introductory physics with in depth discussion on special relativity, wave-particle duality, the Schroedinger equation, electrons in solids, quantum tunneling, nuclear structure and transmutations. Registration is strongly recommended for declared physics majors and those considering majoring or minoring in physics. Prerequisite: PHGN200; Concurrent enrollment in MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Modern Physics I3.0
CSCI250
CSCI250. PYTHON-BASED COMPUTING: BUILDING A SENSOR SYSTEM. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) This course will teach students the skills needed for data collection, analysis, and visualization on a small embedded device (e.g., Raspberry Pi). Students will learn basic Linux, Python, and the programming skills needed to control the hardware and associated sensors. This hands-on course includes a baseline project, four introductory projects (e.g., acoustic, acceleration, magnetic field, optical), and a final Capstone project. The Capstone project will have students create their own application using the techniques learned during the first half of the semester; students will then present their Capstone project through a formal presentation, write-up, and demonstration. We suggest the student take "Introduction to Computer Science" before this course. Co-requisites: MATH213, PHGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Python-Based Computing3.0
PAGN20X
Variable. https://catalog.mines.edu/coursesaz/physact/
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL16.5
SUMMER FIELD SESSION
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN384
PHGN384. FIELD SESSION TECHNIQUES IN PHYSICS. 1-6 SEMESTER HR.(S) Introduction to the design and fabrication of engineering physics apparatus. Intensive individual participation in the design of machined system components, vacuum systems, electronics, optics, and application of computer interfacing systems and computational tools. Supplementary lectures on safety, laboratory techniques and professional development. Visits to regional research facilities and industrial plants. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310, PHGN215, CSCI250. 6 semester hours.

Summer Field Session6.0
TOTAL6.0
JUNIOR YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN311
PHGN311. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Demonstration of the unity of diverse topics such as mechanics, quantum mechanics, optics, and electricity and magnetism via the techniques of linear algebra, complex variables, Fourier transforms, and vector calculus. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310, MATH225, MATH332, and CSCI250. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Introduction to Mathematical Physics3.0
PHGN315
PHGN315. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB I. 2.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) Introduction to laboratory measurement techniques as applied to modern physics experiments. Experiments from optics and atomic physics. A writing-intensive course with laboratory and computer design projects based on applications of modern physics. Prerequisite: PHGN300/310, PHGN384. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.

Advanced Lab I2.0
PHGN317
PHGN317. SEMICONDUCTOR CIRCUITS- DIGITAL. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Introduction to digital devices used in modern electronics. Topics covered include logic gates, flip-flops, timers, counters, multiplexing, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog devices. Emphasis is on practical circuit design and assembly. Prerequisite: PHGN215 and CSCI250. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Digital Circuits3.0
PHGN350
PHGN350. INTERMEDIATE MECHANICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Begins with an intermediate treatment of Newtonian mechanics and continues through an introduction to Hamilton's principle and Hamiltonian and Lagrangian dynamics. Includes systems of particles, linear and driven oscillators, motion under a central force, two-particle collisions and scattering, motion in non-inertial reference frames and dynamics of rigid bodies.Prerequisite:PHGN200. Corequisite: PHGN311. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
Intermediate Mechanics4.0
HASS Elective I3.0
TOTAL15.0
JUNIOR YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN320
PHGN320. MODERN PHYSICS II: BASICS OF QUANTUM MECHANICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Introduction to the Schroedinger theory of quantum mechanics. Topics include Schroedinger's equation, quantum theory of measurement, the uncertainty principle, eigenfunctions and energy spectra, anular momentum, perturbation theory, and the treatment of identical particles. Example applications taken from atomic, molecular, solid state or nuclear systems. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310 and PHGN311. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.

Modern Physics II4.0
PHGN326
PHGN326. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB II. 2.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN315. A writing-intensive course which expands laboratory experiments to include nuclear and solid state physics. Prerequisite: PHGN315. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
Advanced Lab II2.0
PHGN341
PHGN341. THERMAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) An introduction to statistical physics from the quantum mechanical point of view. The microcanonical and canonical ensembles. Heat, work and the laws of thermodynamics. Thermodynamic potentials; Maxwell relations; phase transformations. Elementary kinetic theory. An introduction to quantum statistics. Prerequisite: CHGN122 or CHGN125 and PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Thermal Physics3.0
PHGN361
PHGN361. INTERMEDIATE ELECTROMAGNETISM. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Theory and application of the following: static electric and magnetic fields in free space, dielectric materials, and magnetic materials; steady currents; scalar and vector potentials; Gauss' law and Laplace's equation applied to boundary value problems; Ampere's and Faraday's laws. Prerequisite: PHGN200 and PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Intermediate Electromagnetism3.0
EBGN201
EBGN201. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II,S) Introduction to microeconomics and macroeconomics. This course focuses on applying the economic way of thinking and basic tools of economic analysis. Economic effects of public policies. Analysis of markets for goods, services and resources. Tools of cost-benefit analysis. Measures of overall economic activity. Determinants of economic growth. Monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisites: None. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Principles of Economics3.0
TOTAL15.0
SENIOR YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN471
PHGN471. SENIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES I. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) The first of a two semester sequence covering the principles of project design. Class sessions cover effective team organization, project planning, time management, literature research methods, record keeping, fundamentals of technical writing, professional ethics, project funding and intellectual property. Prerequisites: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisites: PHGN481 or PHGN491. 1 hour lecture in 7 class sessions; 0.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Principles0.5
PHGN481 △√
PHGN481. SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE. 2.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) The first of a two semester program covering the full spectrum of project design, drawing on all of the student's previous course work. At the beginning of the first semester, the student selects a research project in consultation with the Senior Design Oversight Committee (SDOC) and the Project Mentor. The objectives of the project are given to the student in broad outline form. The student then designs the entire project, including any or all of the following elements as appropriate: literature search, specialized apparatus or algorithms, block-diagram electronics, computer data acquisition and/or analysis, sample materials, and measurement and/or analysis sequences. The course culminates in a formal interim written report. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN471. 6 hour lab; 2.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Practice2.5
PHGN462
PHGN462. ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES AND OPTICAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Solutions to the electromagnetic wave equation are studied, including plane waves, guided waves, refraction, interference, diffraction and polarization; applications in optics; imaging, lasers, resonators and wave guides. Prerequisite: PHGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Electromagnetic Waves and Optical Physics3.0
HASS Elective II3.0
PHGN511
PHGN511. MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Review of complex variable and finite and infinite-dimensional linear vector spaces. Sturm-Liouville problem, integral equations, computer algebra. Prerequisite: PHGN311 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Mathematical Physics3.0
Applied Physics elective/core3.0
TOTAL15.0
SENIOR YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN472
PHGN472. SENIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES II. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN471. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN482 or PHGN492. 1 hour lecture in 7 class sessions; 0.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Principles0.5
PHGN482 △√
PHGN482. SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE. 2.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN481. The course culminates in a formal written report and poster. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN472. 6 hour lab; 2.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Practice2.5
Engineering Topics Elective3.0
HASS Elective III3.0
PHGN520
PHGN520. QUANTUM MECHANICS I. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Schroedinger equation, uncertainty, change of representation, one-dimensonal problems, axioms for state vectors and operators, matrix mechanics, uncertainty relations, time-independent perturbation theory, time-dependent perturbations, harmonic oscillator, angular momentum; semiclassical methods, variational methods, two-level system, sudden and adiabatic changes, applications. Prerequisite: PHGN511 and PHGN320 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Quantum Mechanics I3.0
Applied Physics elective/core3.0
TOTAL15.0
GRAND TOTAL130.5
** The Physics Department recommends taking PHGN310.
*** CSCI101 is only 3 credits. Students taking this course must take at least one additional credit to meet total credit hour requirements.
■ Any flavor of EPICS II is allowed for Physics. EPIC269 is offered only in the Fall.
√ Significant design
△ Honors courses PHGN 491/492 may be substituted with the instructor's consent.

PDF version

BS Engineering Physics / MS Electrical Engineering, Energy Systems Power Electronics
FRESHMAN YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH111
MATH111. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS111, (I, II, S) First course in the calculus sequence, including elements of plane geometry. Functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and their application. Definite and indefinite integrals; Prerequisite: precalculus. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.
Calculus for Scientists and Engineers I4.0
CHGN121
CHGN121. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II) Study of matter and energy based on atomic structure, correlation of properties of elements with position in periodic chart, chemical bonding, geometry of molecules, phase changes, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, gas laws, and thermochemistry. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-SC1.

Principles of Chemistry I4.0
LAIS100
HASS100. NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES. 4.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with LAIS100, Nature and Human Values will focus on diverse views and critical questions concerning traditional and contemporary issues linking the quality of human life and Nature, and their interdependence. The course will examine various disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches regarding two major questions: 1) How has Nature affected the quality of human life and the formulation of human values and ethics? (2) How have human actions, values, and ethics affected Nature? These issues will use cases and examples taken from across time and cultures. Themes will include but are not limited to population, natural resources, stewardship of the Earth, and the future of human society. This is a writing-intensive course that will provide instruction and practice in expository writing, using the disciplines and perspectives of the Humanities and Social Sciences. 4 hours lecture/seminar; 4 semester hours.
Nature and Human Values4.0
GEGN101 or
GEGN101. EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with SYGN101, (I, II, S) Fundamental concepts concerning the nature, composition and evolution of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere of the earth integrating the basic sciences of chemistry, physics, biology and mathematics. Understanding of anthropological interactions with the natural systems, and related discussions on cycling of energy and mass, global warming, natural hazards, land use, mitigation of environmental problems such as toxic waste disposal, exploitation and conservation of energy, mineral and agricultural resources, proper use of water resources, biodiversity and construction. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

CBEN110 or
CBEN110. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with BELS311,BIOL110, (I, II) Fundamentals of Biology with Laboratory I. This course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of biology and use illustrative examples and laboratory investigations that highlight the interface of biology with engineering. The focus will be on (1) the scientific method; (2) structural, molecular, and energetic basis of cellular activities; (3) mechanisms of storage and transfer of genetic information in biological organisms; (4) a laboratory 'toolbox' that will carry them forward in their laboratory-based courses. This core course in biology will be interdisciplinary in nature and will incorporate the major themes and mission of this school - earth, energy, and the environment. Lecture Hours: 3; Lab Hours: 3; Semester Hours: 4.

CSCI101***
CSCI101. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II) An introductory course to the building blocks of Computer Science. Topics include conventional computer hardware, data representation, the role of operating systems and networks in modern computing, algorithm design, privacy and information security, data science, artificial intelligence, and computer ethics. A popular procedural programming language will be learned by students and programming assignments will explore ideas in algorithm development, optimization, and data manipulation. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Earth and Environmental Systems or
Fundamentals of Biology or
Introduction to Computer Science
4.0
CSM101
CSM101. FRESHMAN SUCCESS SEMINAR. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. FIRST-YEAR ADVISING AND MENTORING PROGRAM is a "college transition" course, taught in small groups. Emphasis is placed on fostering connectedness to CSM, developing an appreciation of the value of a Mines education, and learning the techniques and University resources that will allow freshmen to develop to their fullest potential at CSM. Course Objectives: Become an integrated member of the CSM community; explore, select and connect with an academic major; and develop as a person and a student. 9 meetings during semester; 0.5 semester hours.

Success Seminar0.5
PAGN101
PAGN101. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) A general overview of life fitness basics which includes exposure to educational units of Nutrition, Stress Management, Drug and Alcohol Awareness. Instruction in Fitness units provides the student an opportunity for learning and the beginning basics for a healthy life style. 2 hours lab; 0.5 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL17.0
FRESHMAN YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH112
MATH112. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS112,MATH122, (I, II, S) Vectors, applications and techniques of integration, infinite series, and an introduction to multivariate functions and surfaces. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MATH111. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.

Calculus for Scientists and Engineers Calculus II4.0
CHGN125
CHGN125. MOLECULAR ENGINEERING & MATERIALS CHEMISTRY. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II) Studies of the interactions of matter and energy in chemical reactions and physical processes. Building on principles from CHGN121, the course systematically explores the relationships between processes, structures and properties, starting from the atomic and molecular level. It provides a framework to apply knowledge of chemical bonding and material properties to engineering design, with an emphasis on the Engineering Grand Challenges and the discovery of new process-structure-property relationships. There is a strong focus on the underlying principles of kinetics and equilibrium, and their general applicability, strongly rooted in the first and second law of thermodynamics. Examples of these principles come primarily from solid-state systems. Laboratory experiments emphasize conceptual understanding of structure-property relationships through both hands-on and computational analysis, reinforced by quantitative chemical measurements. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CHGN121. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

Molecular Engineering and Materials Chemistry 4.0
PHGN100
PHGN100. PHYSICS I - MECHANICS. 4.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II,S) A first course in physics covering the basic principles of mechanics using vectors and calculus. The course consists of a fundamental treatment of the concepts and applications of kinematics and dynamics of particles and systems of particles, including Newton's laws, energy and momentum, rotation, oscillations, and waves. Prerequisite: MATH111. Co-requisites: MATH112 or MATH113 or MATH122. 2 hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-SC1.

Physics I Mechanics4.5
EPIC151
EDNS151. INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with EPIC151, (I, II, S) Introduction to Design teaches students how to solve open-ended problems in a hands-on manner using critical thinking and workplace skills. Students work in multidisciplinary teams to learn through doing, with emphasis on defining and diagnosing the problem through a holistic lens of technology, people and culture. Students follow a user-centered design methodology throughout the process, seeking to understand a problem from multiple perspectives before attempting to solve it. Students learn and apply specific skills throughout the semester, including: communication (written, oral, graphical), project management, concept visualization, critical thinking, effective teamwork, as well as building and iterating solutions. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Design I3.0
PAGN102
PAGN102. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Sections in physical fitness and team sports, relating to personal health and wellness activities. 2 hours lab; 0.5 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL16.0
SOPHOMORE YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH213
MATH213. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) Multivariable calculus, including partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.
Calculus for Scientists and Engineers Calculus III4.0
PHGN200
PHGN200. PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS. 4.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) Continuation of PHGN100. Introduction to the fundamental laws and concepts of electricity and magnetism, electromagnetic devices, electromagnetic behavior of materials, applications to simple circuits, electromagnetic radiation, and an introduction to optical phenomena. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or higher in PHGN100, concurrent enrollment in MATH213 or MATH214 or MATH223. 2 hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5 semester hours.
Physics II Electromagnetism and Optics4.5
EPIC269 ■√
EDNS269. EPICS II: ENGINEERING PHYSICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with EPIC269, (I) Design EPICS II builds on the design process introduced in Design EPICS I, and focuses on open-ended problem solving in which students use teamwork to develop computer software as a tool to solve problems related to engineering physics. Students will learn basic programming skills and apply them to projects that relate to current research and applications of physics. Projects are selected to represent real world physics problems wherein creative and critical thinking skills are necessary. These projects often involve computer-based optimization to obtain a solution. Students will learn how to analyze errors in data, and their effects on data interpretation and decision-making. Engineering Physics majors are encouraged to take this course in the sophomore year. It is open to other students on a space-available basis. Prerequisite: EDNS151, EDNS155, EDNS192, or HNRS115. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
EPICS II Engineering Physics3.0
LAIS200
HASS200. GLOBAL STUDIES. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with LAIS200,SYGN200, (I, II, S) Part of the Mines core curriculum, following the first-year requirement of HASS 100 (Nature and Human Values). Modern scientists and engineers operate in an increasingly interconnected world. This course is designed to enhance student capacity to understand, appreciate, and critically analyze the global contexts in which they will live and work. Course material examines the modern world through specific thematic lenses, with an emphasis on the major patterns of cultural, political, and/or environmental change. Students will develop original analysis through comparative empirical research on diverse societies and regions, and will communicate this analysis orally and in writing. Prerequisite: HASS100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Human Systems3.0
CSCI261 ****
CSCI261. PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS.
Equivalent with MACS261, (I, II) This course introduces fundamental computer programming concepts using a high-level language and a modern development environment. Programming skills include sequential, selection, and repetition control structures, functions, input and output, primitive data types, basic data structures including arrays and pointers, objects, and classes. Software engineering skills include problem solving, program design, and debugging practices. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Computer Programming3.0
PAGN20X
Variable. https://catalog.mines.edu/coursesaz/physact/
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL18.0
SOPHOMORE YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH225/
MATH225. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS225,MACS315, (I, II, S) Classical techniques for first and higher order equations and systems of equations. Laplace transforms. Phase-plane and stability analysis of non-linear equations and systems. Applications from physics, mechanics, electrical engineering, and environmental sciences. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
235
MATH235. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS HONORS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS325, (II) Same topics as those covered in MATH225 but with additional material and problems. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Differential Equations3.0
MATH332/
MATH332. LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS332, (I, II) Systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants and eigenvalues. Linear operators. Abstract vector spaces. Applications selected from linear programming, physics, graph theory, and other fields. Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
342
MATH342. HONORS LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS342, (II) Same topics as those covered in MATH332 but with additional material and problems as well as a more rigorous presentation. Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Linear Algebra3.0
EENG282
EENG282. ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II) This course provides an engineering science analysis of electrical circuits. DC and AC (single-phase and three-phase) networks are presented. Transient analysis of RC and RL circuits is studied as is the analysis of circuits in sinusoidal steady-state using phasor concepts. The following topics are included: DC and AC circuit analysis, current and charge relationships. Ohm's Law, resistors, inductors, capacitors, equivalent resistance and impedance, Kirchhoff's Laws, Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits, superposition and source transformation, power and energy, maximum power transfer, first order transient response, algebra of complex numbers, phasor representation, time domain and frequency domain concepts, and steady-state analysis of single-phase and three-phase ac power circuits. May not also receive credit for EENG281. Prerequisites: PHGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
Circuits4.0
PHGN300/
PHGN300. PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS I. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with PHGN310, (I) Our technical world is filled with countless examples of modern physics. This course will discuss some historic experiments that led to the key discoveries, and the basic concepts, theories, and models behind some of our present day technologies. Topics may include special relativity, quantum physics, atomic and molecular physics, solid-state physics, semiconductor theory and devices, nuclear physics, particle physics and cosmology. Prerequisite: PHGN200; Concurrent enrollment in MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
310 **
PHGN310. HONORS PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with PHGN300, (II) The third course in introductory physics with in depth discussion on special relativity, wave-particle duality, the Schroedinger equation, electrons in solids, quantum tunneling, nuclear structure and transmutations. Registration is strongly recommended for declared physics majors and those considering majoring or minoring in physics. Prerequisite: PHGN200; Concurrent enrollment in MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Modern Physics I3.0
CSCI250
CSCI250. PYTHON-BASED COMPUTING: BUILDING A SENSOR SYSTEM. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) This course will teach students the skills needed for data collection, analysis, and visualization on a small embedded device (e.g., Raspberry Pi). Students will learn basic Linux, Python, and the programming skills needed to control the hardware and associated sensors. This hands-on course includes a baseline project, four introductory projects (e.g., acoustic, acceleration, magnetic field, optical), and a final Capstone project. The Capstone project will have students create their own application using the techniques learned during the first half of the semester; students will then present their Capstone project through a formal presentation, write-up, and demonstration. We suggest the student take "Introduction to Computer Science" before this course. Co-requisites: MATH213, PHGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Python-Based Computing3.0
PAGN20X
Variable. https://catalog.mines.edu/coursesaz/physact/
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL16.5
SUMMER FIELD SESSION
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN384
PHGN384. FIELD SESSION TECHNIQUES IN PHYSICS. 1-6 SEMESTER HR.(S) Introduction to the design and fabrication of engineering physics apparatus. Intensive individual participation in the design of machined system components, vacuum systems, electronics, optics, and application of computer interfacing systems and computational tools. Supplementary lectures on safety, laboratory techniques and professional development. Visits to regional research facilities and industrial plants. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310, PHGN215, CSCI250. 6 semester hours.

Summer Field Session6.0
TOTAL6.0
JUNIOR YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN311
PHGN311. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Demonstration of the unity of diverse topics such as mechanics, quantum mechanics, optics, and electricity and magnetism via the techniques of linear algebra, complex variables, Fourier transforms, and vector calculus. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310, MATH225, MATH332, and CSCI250. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Introduction to Mathematical Physics3.0
PHGN315
PHGN315. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB I. 2.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) Introduction to laboratory measurement techniques as applied to modern physics experiments. Experiments from optics and atomic physics. A writing-intensive course with laboratory and computer design projects based on applications of modern physics. Prerequisite: PHGN300/310, PHGN384. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
Advanced Lab I2.0
PHGN317
PHGN317. SEMICONDUCTOR CIRCUITS- DIGITAL. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Introduction to digital devices used in modern electronics. Topics covered include logic gates, flip-flops, timers, counters, multiplexing, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog devices. Emphasis is on practical circuit design and assembly. Prerequisite: PHGN215 and CSCI250. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Digital Circuits3.0
PHGN350
PHGN350. INTERMEDIATE MECHANICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Begins with an intermediate treatment of Newtonian mechanics and continues through an introduction to Hamilton's principle and Hamiltonian and Lagrangian dynamics. Includes systems of particles, linear and driven oscillators, motion under a central force, two-particle collisions and scattering, motion in non-inertial reference frames and dynamics of rigid bodies.Prerequisite:PHGN200. Corequisite: PHGN311. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
Intermediate Mechanics4.0
HASS Elective I3.0
TOTAL15.0
JUNIOR YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN320
PHGN320. MODERN PHYSICS II: BASICS OF QUANTUM MECHANICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Introduction to the Schroedinger theory of quantum mechanics. Topics include Schroedinger's equation, quantum theory of measurement, the uncertainty principle, eigenfunctions and energy spectra, anular momentum, perturbation theory, and the treatment of identical particles. Example applications taken from atomic, molecular, solid state or nuclear systems. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310 and PHGN311. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
Modern Physics II4.0
PHGN326
PHGN326. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB II. 2.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN315. A writing-intensive course which expands laboratory experiments to include nuclear and solid state physics. Prerequisite: PHGN315. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
Advanced Lab II2.0
PHGN341
PHGN341. THERMAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) An introduction to statistical physics from the quantum mechanical point of view. The microcanonical and canonical ensembles. Heat, work and the laws of thermodynamics. Thermodynamic potentials; Maxwell relations; phase transformations. Elementary kinetic theory. An introduction to quantum statistics. Prerequisite: CHGN122 or CHGN125 and PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Thermal Physics3.0
PHGN361
PHGN361. INTERMEDIATE ELECTROMAGNETISM. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Theory and application of the following: static electric and magnetic fields in free space, dielectric materials, and magnetic materials; steady currents; scalar and vector potentials; Gauss' law and Laplace's equation applied to boundary value problems; Ampere's and Faraday's laws. Prerequisite: PHGN200 and PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Intermediate Electromagnetism3.0
EENG389
EENG389. FUNDAMENTALS OF ELECTRIC MACHINERY. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with EGGN389, (I, II) This course provides an engineering analysis of electrical machines. The following topics are included: review of three-phase AC circuit analysis, magnetic circuit concepts and materials, transformer analysis and operation, modelling, steady-state analysis of rotating machines, synchronous and poly-phase induction motors, and DC machines and laboratory study of external characteristics of machines and transformers. Prerequisite: EENG281 (C- or better) or EENG282 (C- or better). 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

Fundamentals of Electric Machinery3.0
TOTAL15.0
SENIOR YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN471
PHGN471. SENIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES I. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) The first of a two semester sequence covering the principles of project design. Class sessions cover effective team organization, project planning, time management, literature research methods, record keeping, fundamentals of technical writing, professional ethics, project funding and intellectual property. Prerequisites: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisites: PHGN481 or PHGN491. 1 hour lecture in 7 class sessions; 0.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Principles0.5
PHGN481 △√
PHGN481. SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE. 2.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) The first of a two semester program covering the full spectrum of project design, drawing on all of the student's previous course work. At the beginning of the first semester, the student selects a research project in consultation with the Senior Design Oversight Committee (SDOC) and the Project Mentor. The objectives of the project are given to the student in broad outline form. The student then designs the entire project, including any or all of the following elements as appropriate: literature search, specialized apparatus or algorithms, block-diagram electronics, computer data acquisition and/or analysis, sample materials, and measurement and/or analysis sequences. The course culminates in a formal interim written report. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN471. 6 hour lab; 2.5 semester hours.

Senior Design Practice2.5
PHGN462
PHGN462. ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES AND OPTICAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Solutions to the electromagnetic wave equation are studied, including plane waves, guided waves, refraction, interference, diffraction and polarization; applications in optics; imaging, lasers, resonators and wave guides. Prerequisite: PHGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Electromagnetic Waves and Optical Physics3.0
HASS Elective II3.0
EENG480
EENG480. POWER SYSTEMS ANALYSIS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS.
Equivalent with EGGN484, (I) 3-phase power systems, per-unit calculations, modeling and equivalent circuits of major components, voltage drop, fault calculations, symmetrical components and unsymmetrical faults, system grounding, power-flow, selection of major equipment, design of electric power distribution systems. Prerequisite: EENG389. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Power Systems Analysis3.0
EBGN201
EBGN201. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II,S) Introduction to microeconomics and macroeconomics. This course focuses on applying the economic way of thinking and basic tools of economic analysis. Economic effects of public policies. Analysis of markets for goods, services and resources. Tools of cost-benefit analysis. Measures of overall economic activity. Determinants of economic growth. Monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisites: None. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Principles of Economics3.0
TOTAL15.0
SENIOR YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN472
PHGN472. SENIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES II. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN471. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN482 or PHGN492. 1 hour lecture in 7 class sessions; 0.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Principles0.5
PHGN482 △√
PHGN482. SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE. 2.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN481. The course culminates in a formal written report and poster. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN472. 6 hour lab; 2.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Practice2.5
EENG481
EENG481. ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF ADVANCED ENERGY SYSTEMS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with EGGN487, (II) The course investigates the design, operation and analysis of complex interconnected electric power grids, the basis of our electric power infrastructure. Evaluating the system operation, planning for the future expansion under deregulation and restructuring, ensuring system reliability, maintaining security, and developing systems that are safe to operate has become increasingly more difficult. Because of the complexity of the problems encountered, analysis and design procedures rely on the use of sophisticated power system simulation computer programs. The course features some commonly used commercial software packages. Prerequisites: EENG480. 2 Lecture Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours, 3 Semester Hours.

Analysis and Design of Advanced Energy Systems3.0
HASS Elective III3.0
EENG385
EENG385. ELECTRONIC DEVICES AND CIRCUITS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with EGGN385, (I, II) Semiconductor materials and characteristics, junction diode operation, bipolar junction transistors, field effect transistors, biasing techniques, four layer devices, amplifier and power supply design, laboratory study of semiconductor circuit characteristics. Prerequisite: EENG307. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

Electronic Devices and Circuits3.0
EENG307
EENG307. INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK CONTROL SYSTEMS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with EGGN307,EGGN407, (I, II) System modeling through an energy flow approach is presented, with examples from linear electrical, mechanical, fluid and/or thermal systems. Analysis of system response in both the time domain and frequency domain is discussed in detail. Feedback control design techniques, including PID, are analyzed using both analytical and computational methods. Prerequisites: EENG281 or EENG282 or PHGN215, and MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Introduction to Feedback Control Systems3.0
TOTAL15.0
GRAND TOTAL133.5
** The Physics Department recommends taking PHGN310.
*** CSCI101 is only 3 credits. Students taking this course must take at least one additional credit to meet total credit hour requirements.
■ Any flavor of EPICS II is allowed for Physics. EPIC269 is offered only in the Fall.
√ Significant design
△ Honors courses PHGN491/492 may be substituted with the instructor's consent.

PDF version

BS Engineering Physics / MS Electrical Engineering, Information and Systems Sciences
FRESHMAN YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH111
MATH111. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS111, (I, II, S) First course in the calculus sequence, including elements of plane geometry. Functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and their application. Definite and indefinite integrals; Prerequisite: precalculus. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.
Calculus for Scientists and Engineers I4.0
CHGN121
CHGN121. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II) Study of matter and energy based on atomic structure, correlation of properties of elements with position in periodic chart, chemical bonding, geometry of molecules, phase changes, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, gas laws, and thermochemistry. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-SC1.

Principles of Chemistry I4.0
LAIS100
HASS100. NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES. 4.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with LAIS100, Nature and Human Values will focus on diverse views and critical questions concerning traditional and contemporary issues linking the quality of human life and Nature, and their interdependence. The course will examine various disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches regarding two major questions: 1) How has Nature affected the quality of human life and the formulation of human values and ethics? (2) How have human actions, values, and ethics affected Nature? These issues will use cases and examples taken from across time and cultures. Themes will include but are not limited to population, natural resources, stewardship of the Earth, and the future of human society. This is a writing-intensive course that will provide instruction and practice in expository writing, using the disciplines and perspectives of the Humanities and Social Sciences. 4 hours lecture/seminar; 4 semester hours.
Nature and Human Values4.0
GEGN101 or
GEGN101. EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with SYGN101, (I, II, S) Fundamental concepts concerning the nature, composition and evolution of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere of the earth integrating the basic sciences of chemistry, physics, biology and mathematics. Understanding of anthropological interactions with the natural systems, and related discussions on cycling of energy and mass, global warming, natural hazards, land use, mitigation of environmental problems such as toxic waste disposal, exploitation and conservation of energy, mineral and agricultural resources, proper use of water resources, biodiversity and construction. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

CBEN110 or
CBEN110. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with BELS311,BIOL110, (I, II) Fundamentals of Biology with Laboratory I. This course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of biology and use illustrative examples and laboratory investigations that highlight the interface of biology with engineering. The focus will be on (1) the scientific method; (2) structural, molecular, and energetic basis of cellular activities; (3) mechanisms of storage and transfer of genetic information in biological organisms; (4) a laboratory 'toolbox' that will carry them forward in their laboratory-based courses. This core course in biology will be interdisciplinary in nature and will incorporate the major themes and mission of this school - earth, energy, and the environment. Lecture Hours: 3; Lab Hours: 3; Semester Hours: 4.

CSCI101***
CSCI101. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II) An introductory course to the building blocks of Computer Science. Topics include conventional computer hardware, data representation, the role of operating systems and networks in modern computing, algorithm design, privacy and information security, data science, artificial intelligence, and computer ethics. A popular procedural programming language will be learned by students and programming assignments will explore ideas in algorithm development, optimization, and data manipulation. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Earth and Environmental Systems or
Fundamentals of Biology or
Introduction to Computer Science
4.0
CSM101
CSM101. FRESHMAN SUCCESS SEMINAR. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. FIRST-YEAR ADVISING AND MENTORING PROGRAM is a "college transition" course, taught in small groups. Emphasis is placed on fostering connectedness to CSM, developing an appreciation of the value of a Mines education, and learning the techniques and University resources that will allow freshmen to develop to their fullest potential at CSM. Course Objectives: Become an integrated member of the CSM community; explore, select and connect with an academic major; and develop as a person and a student. 9 meetings during semester; 0.5 semester hours.

Success Seminar0.5
PAGN101
PAGN101. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) A general overview of life fitness basics which includes exposure to educational units of Nutrition, Stress Management, Drug and Alcohol Awareness. Instruction in Fitness units provides the student an opportunity for learning and the beginning basics for a healthy life style. 2 hours lab; 0.5 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL17.0
FRESHMAN YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH112
MATH112. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS112,MATH122, (I, II, S) Vectors, applications and techniques of integration, infinite series, and an introduction to multivariate functions and surfaces. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MATH111. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.

Calculus for Scientists and Engineers II4.0
CHGN125
CHGN125. MOLECULAR ENGINEERING & MATERIALS CHEMISTRY. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II) Studies of the interactions of matter and energy in chemical reactions and physical processes. Building on principles from CHGN121, the course systematically explores the relationships between processes, structures and properties, starting from the atomic and molecular level. It provides a framework to apply knowledge of chemical bonding and material properties to engineering design, with an emphasis on the Engineering Grand Challenges and the discovery of new process-structure-property relationships. There is a strong focus on the underlying principles of kinetics and equilibrium, and their general applicability, strongly rooted in the first and second law of thermodynamics. Examples of these principles come primarily from solid-state systems. Laboratory experiments emphasize conceptual understanding of structure-property relationships through both hands-on and computational analysis, reinforced by quantitative chemical measurements. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CHGN121. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
Molecular Engineering and Materials Chemistry 4.0
PHGN100
PHGN100. PHYSICS I - MECHANICS. 4.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II,S) A first course in physics covering the basic principles of mechanics using vectors and calculus. The course consists of a fundamental treatment of the concepts and applications of kinematics and dynamics of particles and systems of particles, including Newton's laws, energy and momentum, rotation, oscillations, and waves. Prerequisite: MATH111. Co-requisites: MATH112 or MATH113 or MATH122. 2 hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-SC1.
Physics I Mechanics4.5
EPIC151
EDNS151. INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with EPIC151, (I, II, S) Introduction to Design teaches students how to solve open-ended problems in a hands-on manner using critical thinking and workplace skills. Students work in multidisciplinary teams to learn through doing, with emphasis on defining and diagnosing the problem through a holistic lens of technology, people and culture. Students follow a user-centered design methodology throughout the process, seeking to understand a problem from multiple perspectives before attempting to solve it. Students learn and apply specific skills throughout the semester, including: communication (written, oral, graphical), project management, concept visualization, critical thinking, effective teamwork, as well as building and iterating solutions. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Design I3.0
PAGN102
PAGN102. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Sections in physical fitness and team sports, relating to personal health and wellness activities. 2 hours lab; 0.5 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL16.0
SOPHOMORE YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH213
MATH213. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) Multivariable calculus, including partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.
Calculus for Scientists and Engineers III4.0
PHGN200
PHGN200. PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS. 4.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) Continuation of PHGN100. Introduction to the fundamental laws and concepts of electricity and magnetism, electromagnetic devices, electromagnetic behavior of materials, applications to simple circuits, electromagnetic radiation, and an introduction to optical phenomena. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or higher in PHGN100, concurrent enrollment in MATH213 or MATH214 or MATH223. 2 hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5 semester hours.
Physics II Electromagnetism and Optics4.5
EPIC269 ■√
EDNS269. EPICS II: ENGINEERING PHYSICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with EPIC269, (I) Design EPICS II builds on the design process introduced in Design EPICS I, and focuses on open-ended problem solving in which students use teamwork to develop computer software as a tool to solve problems related to engineering physics. Students will learn basic programming skills and apply them to projects that relate to current research and applications of physics. Projects are selected to represent real world physics problems wherein creative and critical thinking skills are necessary. These projects often involve computer-based optimization to obtain a solution. Students will learn how to analyze errors in data, and their effects on data interpretation and decision-making. Engineering Physics majors are encouraged to take this course in the sophomore year. It is open to other students on a space-available basis. Prerequisite: EDNS151, EDNS155, EDNS192, or HNRS115. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

EPICS II Engineering Physics3.0
LAIS200
HASS200. GLOBAL STUDIES. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with LAIS200,SYGN200, (I, II, S) Part of the Mines core curriculum, following the first-year requirement of HASS 100 (Nature and Human Values). Modern scientists and engineers operate in an increasingly interconnected world. This course is designed to enhance student capacity to understand, appreciate, and critically analyze the global contexts in which they will live and work. Course material examines the modern world through specific thematic lenses, with an emphasis on the major patterns of cultural, political, and/or environmental change. Students will develop original analysis through comparative empirical research on diverse societies and regions, and will communicate this analysis orally and in writing. Prerequisite: HASS100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Human Systems3.0
CSCI261 ****
CSCI261. PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS.
Equivalent with MACS261, (I, II) This course introduces fundamental computer programming concepts using a high-level language and a modern development environment. Programming skills include sequential, selection, and repetition control structures, functions, input and output, primitive data types, basic data structures including arrays and pointers, objects, and classes. Software engineering skills include problem solving, program design, and debugging practices. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Computer Programming3.0
PAGN20X
Variable. https://catalog.mines.edu/coursesaz/physact/
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL18.0
SOPHOMORE YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH225/
MATH225. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS225,MACS315, (I, II, S) Classical techniques for first and higher order equations and systems of equations. Laplace transforms. Phase-plane and stability analysis of non-linear equations and systems. Applications from physics, mechanics, electrical engineering, and environmental sciences. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
235
MATH235. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS HONORS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS325, (II) Same topics as those covered in MATH225 but with additional material and problems. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Differential Equations3.0
MATH332/
MATH332. LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS332, (I, II) Systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants and eigenvalues. Linear operators. Abstract vector spaces. Applications selected from linear programming, physics, graph theory, and other fields. Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
342
MATH342. HONORS LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS342, (II) Same topics as those covered in MATH332 but with additional material and problems as well as a more rigorous presentation. Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Linear Algebra3.0
PHGN215
PHGN215. ANALOG ELECTRONICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Introduction to analog devices used in modern electronics and basic topics in electrical engineering. Introduction to methods of electronics measurements, particularly the application of oscilloscopes and computer based data acquisition. Topics covered include circuit analysis, electrical power, diodes, transistors (FET and BJT), operational amplifiers, filters, transducers, and integrated circuits. Laboratory experiments in the use of basic electronics for physical measurements. Emphasis is on practical knowledge gained in the laboratory, including prototyping, troubleshooting, and laboratory notebook style. Prerequisite: PHGN200. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

Analog Circuits4.0
PHGN300/
PHGN300. PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS I. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with PHGN310, (I) Our technical world is filled with countless examples of modern physics. This course will discuss some historic experiments that led to the key discoveries, and the basic concepts, theories, and models behind some of our present day technologies. Topics may include special relativity, quantum physics, atomic and molecular physics, solid-state physics, semiconductor theory and devices, nuclear physics, particle physics and cosmology. Prerequisite: PHGN200; Concurrent enrollment in MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
310 **
PHGN310. HONORS PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with PHGN300, (II) The third course in introductory physics with in depth discussion on special relativity, wave-particle duality, the Schroedinger equation, electrons in solids, quantum tunneling, nuclear structure and transmutations. Registration is strongly recommended for declared physics majors and those considering majoring or minoring in physics. Prerequisite: PHGN200; Concurrent enrollment in MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Modern Physics I3.0
CSCI250
CSCI250. PYTHON-BASED COMPUTING: BUILDING A SENSOR SYSTEM. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) This course will teach students the skills needed for data collection, analysis, and visualization on a small embedded device (e.g., Raspberry Pi). Students will learn basic Linux, Python, and the programming skills needed to control the hardware and associated sensors. This hands-on course includes a baseline project, four introductory projects (e.g., acoustic, acceleration, magnetic field, optical), and a final Capstone project. The Capstone project will have students create their own application using the techniques learned during the first half of the semester; students will then present their Capstone project through a formal presentation, write-up, and demonstration. We suggest the student take "Introduction to Computer Science" before this course. Co-requisites: MATH213, PHGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Python-Based Computing3.0
PAGN20X
Variable. https://catalog.mines.edu/coursesaz/physact/
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL16.5
SUMMER FIELD SESSION
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN384
PHGN384. FIELD SESSION TECHNIQUES IN PHYSICS. 1-6 SEMESTER HR.(S) Introduction to the design and fabrication of engineering physics apparatus. Intensive individual participation in the design of machined system components, vacuum systems, electronics, optics, and application of computer interfacing systems and computational tools. Supplementary lectures on safety, laboratory techniques and professional development. Visits to regional research facilities and industrial plants. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310, PHGN215, CSCI250. 6 semester hours.

Summer Field Session6.0
TOTAL6.0
JUNIOR YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN311
PHGN311. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Demonstration of the unity of diverse topics such as mechanics, quantum mechanics, optics, and electricity and magnetism via the techniques of linear algebra, complex variables, Fourier transforms, and vector calculus. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310, MATH225, MATH332, and CSCI250. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Introduction to Mathematical Physics3.0
PHGN315
PHGN315. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB I. 2.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) Introduction to laboratory measurement techniques as applied to modern physics experiments. Experiments from optics and atomic physics. A writing-intensive course with laboratory and computer design projects based on applications of modern physics. Prerequisite: PHGN300/310, PHGN384. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
Advanced Lab I2.0
PHGN317
PHGN317. SEMICONDUCTOR CIRCUITS- DIGITAL. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Introduction to digital devices used in modern electronics. Topics covered include logic gates, flip-flops, timers, counters, multiplexing, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog devices. Emphasis is on practical circuit design and assembly. Prerequisite: PHGN215 and CSCI250. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Digital Circuits3.0
PHGN350
PHGN350. INTERMEDIATE MECHANICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Begins with an intermediate treatment of Newtonian mechanics and continues through an introduction to Hamilton's principle and Hamiltonian and Lagrangian dynamics. Includes systems of particles, linear and driven oscillators, motion under a central force, two-particle collisions and scattering, motion in non-inertial reference frames and dynamics of rigid bodies.Prerequisite:PHGN200. Corequisite: PHGN311. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
Intermediate Mechanics4.0
EENG307
EENG307. INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK CONTROL SYSTEMS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with EGGN307,EGGN407, (I, II) System modeling through an energy flow approach is presented, with examples from linear electrical, mechanical, fluid and/or thermal systems. Analysis of system response in both the time domain and frequency domain is discussed in detail. Feedback control design techniques, including PID, are analyzed using both analytical and computational methods. Prerequisites: EENG281 or EENG282 or PHGN215, and MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Introduction to Feedback Control Systems3.0
EENG388
EENG310. INFORMATION SYSTEMS SCIENCE I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with EENG388,EGGN388, (I, II) The interpretation, representation and analysis of time-varying phenomena as signals which convey information and noise; applications are drawn from filtering, audio and image processing, and communications. Topics include convolution, Fourier series and transforms, sampling and discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals, modulation, and z-transforms. Prerequisites: (EENG281 or EENG282 or PHGN215) and MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 1 hour recitation, 4 semester hours.
Information Systems Science4.0
TOTAL19.0
JUNIOR YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN320
PHGN320. MODERN PHYSICS II: BASICS OF QUANTUM MECHANICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Introduction to the Schroedinger theory of quantum mechanics. Topics include Schroedinger's equation, quantum theory of measurement, the uncertainty principle, eigenfunctions and energy spectra, anular momentum, perturbation theory, and the treatment of identical particles. Example applications taken from atomic, molecular, solid state or nuclear systems. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310 and PHGN311. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
Modern Physics II4.0
PHGN326
PHGN326. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB II. 2.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN315. A writing-intensive course which expands laboratory experiments to include nuclear and solid state physics. Prerequisite: PHGN315. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
Advanced Lab II2.0
PHGN341
PHGN341. THERMAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) An introduction to statistical physics from the quantum mechanical point of view. The microcanonical and canonical ensembles. Heat, work and the laws of thermodynamics. Thermodynamic potentials; Maxwell relations; phase transformations. Elementary kinetic theory. An introduction to quantum statistics. Prerequisite: CHGN122 or CHGN125 and PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Thermal Physics3.0
PHGN361
PHGN361. INTERMEDIATE ELECTROMAGNETISM. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Theory and application of the following: static electric and magnetic fields in free space, dielectric materials, and magnetic materials; steady currents; scalar and vector potentials; Gauss' law and Laplace's equation applied to boundary value problems; Ampere's and Faraday's laws. Prerequisite: PHGN200 and PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Intermediate Electromagnetism3.0
EENG311
EENG311. INFORMATION SYSTEMS SCIENCE II. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II) This course covers signals and noise in electrical systems. Topics covered include information theory, signal to noise ratio, random variables, probability density functions, statistics, noise, matched filters, coding and entropy, power spectral density, and bit error rate. Applications are taken from radar, communications systems, and signal processing. Prerequisite: EENG310. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Information Systems Science II3.0
TOTAL15.0
SENIOR YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN471
PHGN471. SENIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES I. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) The first of a two semester sequence covering the principles of project design. Class sessions cover effective team organization, project planning, time management, literature research methods, record keeping, fundamentals of technical writing, professional ethics, project funding and intellectual property. Prerequisites: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisites: PHGN481 or PHGN491. 1 hour lecture in 7 class sessions; 0.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Principles0.5
PHGN481 △√
PHGN481. SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE. 2.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) The first of a two semester program covering the full spectrum of project design, drawing on all of the student's previous course work. At the beginning of the first semester, the student selects a research project in consultation with the Senior Design Oversight Committee (SDOC) and the Project Mentor. The objectives of the project are given to the student in broad outline form. The student then designs the entire project, including any or all of the following elements as appropriate: literature search, specialized apparatus or algorithms, block-diagram electronics, computer data acquisition and/or analysis, sample materials, and measurement and/or analysis sequences. The course culminates in a formal interim written report. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN471. 6 hour lab; 2.5 semester hours.

Senior Design Practice2.5
PHGN462
PHGN462. ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES AND OPTICAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Solutions to the electromagnetic wave equation are studied, including plane waves, guided waves, refraction, interference, diffraction and polarization; applications in optics; imaging, lasers, resonators and wave guides. Prerequisite: PHGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Electromagnetic Waves and Optical Physics3.0
EENG417
EENG417. MODERN CONTROL DESIGN. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with EGGN417, (I) Control system design with an emphasis on observer-based methods, from initial open-loop experiments to final implementation. The course begins with an overview of feedback control design technique from the frequency domain perspective, including sensitivity and fundamental limitations. State space realization theory is introduced, and system identification methods for parameter estimation are introduced. Computerbased methods for control system design are presented. Prerequisite: EENG307. 3 lecture hours, 3 semester hours.

Modern Control Design3.0
MEGN441
MEGN441. INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with EGGN400, (I, II) Overview and introduction to the science and engineering of intelligent mobile robotics and robotic manipulators. Covers guidance and force sensing, perception of the environment around a mobile vehicle, reasoning about the environment to identify obstacles and guidance path features and adaptively controlling and monitoring the vehicle health. A lesser emphasis is placed on robot manipulator kinematics, dynamics, and force and tactile sensing. Surveys manipulator and intelligent mobile robotics research and development. Introduces principles and concepts of guidance, position, and force sensing; vision data processing; basic path and trajectory planning algorithms; and force and position control. EENG307 is recommended to be completed before this course. Prerequisites: CSCI261 and EENG281 or EENG282 or PHGN215. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

Introduction to Robotics3.0
HASS Elective I3.0
TOTAL15.0
SENIOR YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN472
PHGN472. SENIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES II. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN471. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN482 or PHGN492. 1 hour lecture in 7 class sessions; 0.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Principles0.5
PHGN482 △√
PHGN482. SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE. 2.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN481. The course culminates in a formal written report and poster. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN472. 6 hour lab; 2.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Practice2.5
EBGN201
EBGN201. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II,S) Introduction to microeconomics and macroeconomics. This course focuses on applying the economic way of thinking and basic tools of economic analysis. Economic effects of public policies. Analysis of markets for goods, services and resources. Tools of cost-benefit analysis. Measures of overall economic activity. Determinants of economic growth. Monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisites: None. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Principles of Economics3.0
EENG411 ⬠√
EENG411. DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with EGGN481, (II) This course introduces the mathematical and engineering aspects of digital signal processing (DSP). An emphasis is placed on the various possible representations for discrete-time signals and systems (in the time, z-, and frequency domains) and how those representations can facilitate the identification of signal properties, the design of digital filters, and the sampling of continuous-time signals. Advanced topics include sigma-delta conversion techniques, multi-rate signal processing, and spectral analysis. The course will be useful to all students who are concerned with information bearing signals and signal processing in a wide variety of application settings, including sensing, instrumentation, control, communications, signal interpretation and diagnostics, and imaging. Prerequisite: EENG310. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Digital Signal Processing3.0
HASS Elective II3.0
HASS Elective III3.0
TOTAL15.0
GRAND TOTAL137.5
** The Physics Department recommends taking PHGN310.
*** CSCI101 is only 3 credits. Students taking this course must take at least one additional credit to meet total credit hour requirements.
■ Any flavor of EPICS II is allowed for Physics. EPIC269 is offered only in the Fall.
√ Significant design
△ Honors courses PHGN491/492 may be substituted with the instructor's consent.
⬠ EENG417 and EENG411 can apply to graduate degree. See advisor.

PDF version

BS Engineering Physics / MS Materials Science
FRESHMAN YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH111
MATH111. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS111, (I, II, S) First course in the calculus sequence, including elements of plane geometry. Functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and their application. Definite and indefinite integrals; Prerequisite: precalculus. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.
Calculus for Scientists and Engineers I4.0
CHGN121
CHGN121. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II) Study of matter and energy based on atomic structure, correlation of properties of elements with position in periodic chart, chemical bonding, geometry of molecules, phase changes, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, gas laws, and thermochemistry. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-SC1.

Principles of Chemistry I4.0
LAIS100
HASS100. NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES. 4.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with LAIS100, Nature and Human Values will focus on diverse views and critical questions concerning traditional and contemporary issues linking the quality of human life and Nature, and their interdependence. The course will examine various disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches regarding two major questions: 1) How has Nature affected the quality of human life and the formulation of human values and ethics? (2) How have human actions, values, and ethics affected Nature? These issues will use cases and examples taken from across time and cultures. Themes will include but are not limited to population, natural resources, stewardship of the Earth, and the future of human society. This is a writing-intensive course that will provide instruction and practice in expository writing, using the disciplines and perspectives of the Humanities and Social Sciences. 4 hours lecture/seminar; 4 semester hours.
Nature and Human Values4.0
GEGN101 or
GEGN101. EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with SYGN101, (I, II, S) Fundamental concepts concerning the nature, composition and evolution of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere of the earth integrating the basic sciences of chemistry, physics, biology and mathematics. Understanding of anthropological interactions with the natural systems, and related discussions on cycling of energy and mass, global warming, natural hazards, land use, mitigation of environmental problems such as toxic waste disposal, exploitation and conservation of energy, mineral and agricultural resources, proper use of water resources, biodiversity and construction. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

CBEN110 or
CBEN110. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with BELS311,BIOL110, (I, II) Fundamentals of Biology with Laboratory I. This course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of biology and use illustrative examples and laboratory investigations that highlight the interface of biology with engineering. The focus will be on (1) the scientific method; (2) structural, molecular, and energetic basis of cellular activities; (3) mechanisms of storage and transfer of genetic information in biological organisms; (4) a laboratory 'toolbox' that will carry them forward in their laboratory-based courses. This core course in biology will be interdisciplinary in nature and will incorporate the major themes and mission of this school - earth, energy, and the environment. Lecture Hours: 3; Lab Hours: 3; Semester Hours: 4.

CSCI101***
CSCI101. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II) An introductory course to the building blocks of Computer Science. Topics include conventional computer hardware, data representation, the role of operating systems and networks in modern computing, algorithm design, privacy and information security, data science, artificial intelligence, and computer ethics. A popular procedural programming language will be learned by students and programming assignments will explore ideas in algorithm development, optimization, and data manipulation. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Earth and Environmental Systems or
Fundamentals of Biology or
Introduction to Computer Science
4.0
CSM101
CSM101. FRESHMAN SUCCESS SEMINAR. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. FIRST-YEAR ADVISING AND MENTORING PROGRAM is a "college transition" course, taught in small groups. Emphasis is placed on fostering connectedness to CSM, developing an appreciation of the value of a Mines education, and learning the techniques and University resources that will allow freshmen to develop to their fullest potential at CSM. Course Objectives: Become an integrated member of the CSM community; explore, select and connect with an academic major; and develop as a person and a student. 9 meetings during semester; 0.5 semester hours.

Success Seminar0.5
PAGN101
PAGN101. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) A general overview of life fitness basics which includes exposure to educational units of Nutrition, Stress Management, Drug and Alcohol Awareness. Instruction in Fitness units provides the student an opportunity for learning and the beginning basics for a healthy life style. 2 hours lab; 0.5 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL17.0
FRESHMAN YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH112
MATH112. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS112,MATH122, (I, II, S) Vectors, applications and techniques of integration, infinite series, and an introduction to multivariate functions and surfaces. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MATH111. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.

Calculus for Scientists and Engineers II4.0
CHGN125
CHGN125. MOLECULAR ENGINEERING & MATERIALS CHEMISTRY. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II) Studies of the interactions of matter and energy in chemical reactions and physical processes. Building on principles from CHGN121, the course systematically explores the relationships between processes, structures and properties, starting from the atomic and molecular level. It provides a framework to apply knowledge of chemical bonding and material properties to engineering design, with an emphasis on the Engineering Grand Challenges and the discovery of new process-structure-property relationships. There is a strong focus on the underlying principles of kinetics and equilibrium, and their general applicability, strongly rooted in the first and second law of thermodynamics. Examples of these principles come primarily from solid-state systems. Laboratory experiments emphasize conceptual understanding of structure-property relationships through both hands-on and computational analysis, reinforced by quantitative chemical measurements. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CHGN121. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
Molecular Engineering and Materials Chemistry 4.0
PHGN100
PHGN100. PHYSICS I - MECHANICS. 4.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II,S) A first course in physics covering the basic principles of mechanics using vectors and calculus. The course consists of a fundamental treatment of the concepts and applications of kinematics and dynamics of particles and systems of particles, including Newton's laws, energy and momentum, rotation, oscillations, and waves. Prerequisite: MATH111. Co-requisites: MATH112 or MATH113 or MATH122. 2 hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-SC1.
Physics I Mechanics4.5
EPIC151
EDNS151. INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with EPIC151, (I, II, S) Introduction to Design teaches students how to solve open-ended problems in a hands-on manner using critical thinking and workplace skills. Students work in multidisciplinary teams to learn through doing, with emphasis on defining and diagnosing the problem through a holistic lens of technology, people and culture. Students follow a user-centered design methodology throughout the process, seeking to understand a problem from multiple perspectives before attempting to solve it. Students learn and apply specific skills throughout the semester, including: communication (written, oral, graphical), project management, concept visualization, critical thinking, effective teamwork, as well as building and iterating solutions. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Design I3.0
PAGN102
PAGN102. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Sections in physical fitness and team sports, relating to personal health and wellness activities. 2 hours lab; 0.5 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL16.0
SOPHOMORE YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH213
MATH213. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) Multivariable calculus, including partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.
Calculus for Scientists and Engineers III4.0
PHGN200
PHGN200. PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS. 4.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) Continuation of PHGN100. Introduction to the fundamental laws and concepts of electricity and magnetism, electromagnetic devices, electromagnetic behavior of materials, applications to simple circuits, electromagnetic radiation, and an introduction to optical phenomena. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or higher in PHGN100, concurrent enrollment in MATH213 or MATH214 or MATH223. 2 hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5 semester hours.
Physics II Electromagnetism and Optics4.5
EPIC269 ■√
EDNS269. EPICS II: ENGINEERING PHYSICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with EPIC269, (I) Design EPICS II builds on the design process introduced in Design EPICS I, and focuses on open-ended problem solving in which students use teamwork to develop computer software as a tool to solve problems related to engineering physics. Students will learn basic programming skills and apply them to projects that relate to current research and applications of physics. Projects are selected to represent real world physics problems wherein creative and critical thinking skills are necessary. These projects often involve computer-based optimization to obtain a solution. Students will learn how to analyze errors in data, and their effects on data interpretation and decision-making. Engineering Physics majors are encouraged to take this course in the sophomore year. It is open to other students on a space-available basis. Prerequisite: EDNS151, EDNS155, EDNS192, or HNRS115. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
EPICS II Engineering Physics3.0
LAIS200
HASS200. GLOBAL STUDIES. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with LAIS200,SYGN200, (I, II, S) Part of the Mines core curriculum, following the first-year requirement of HASS 100 (Nature and Human Values). Modern scientists and engineers operate in an increasingly interconnected world. This course is designed to enhance student capacity to understand, appreciate, and critically analyze the global contexts in which they will live and work. Course material examines the modern world through specific thematic lenses, with an emphasis on the major patterns of cultural, political, and/or environmental change. Students will develop original analysis through comparative empirical research on diverse societies and regions, and will communicate this analysis orally and in writing. Prerequisite: HASS100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Human Systems3.0
PAGN20X
Variable. https://catalog.mines.edu/coursesaz/physact/
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL15.0
SOPHOMORE YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH225/
MATH225. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS225,MACS315,(I, II, S) Classical techniques for first and higher order equations and systems of equations. Laplace transforms. Phase-plane and stability analysis of non-linear equations and systems. Applications from physics, mechanics, electrical engineering, and environmental sciences. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
235
MATH235. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS HONORS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS325, (II) Same topics as those covered in MATH225 but with additional material and problems. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Differential Equations3.0
MATH332/
MATH332. LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS332, (I, II) Systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants and eigenvalues. Linear operators. Abstract vector spaces. Applications selected from linear programming, physics, graph theory, and other fields. Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
342
MATH342. HONORS LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS342, (II) Same topics as those covered in MATH332 but with additional material and problems as well as a more rigorous presentation. Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Linear Algebra3.0
PHGN215
PHGN215. ANALOG ELECTRONICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Introduction to analog devices used in modern electronics and basic topics in electrical engineering. Introduction to methods of electronics measurements, particularly the application of oscilloscopes and computer based data acquisition. Topics covered include circuit analysis, electrical power, diodes, transistors (FET and BJT), operational amplifiers, filters, transducers, and integrated circuits. Laboratory experiments in the use of basic electronics for physical measurements. Emphasis is on practical knowledge gained in the laboratory, including prototyping, troubleshooting, and laboratory notebook style. Prerequisite: PHGN200. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

Analog Circuits4.0
PHGN300/
PHGN300. PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS I. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with PHGN310, (I) Our technical world is filled with countless examples of modern physics. This course will discuss some historic experiments that led to the key discoveries, and the basic concepts, theories, and models behind some of our present day technologies. Topics may include special relativity, quantum physics, atomic and molecular physics, solid-state physics, semiconductor theory and devices, nuclear physics, particle physics and cosmology. Prerequisite: PHGN200; Concurrent enrollment in MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
310 **
PHGN310. HONORS PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with PHGN300, (II) The third course in introductory physics with in depth discussion on special relativity, wave-particle duality, the Schroedinger equation, electrons in solids, quantum tunneling, nuclear structure and transmutations. Registration is strongly recommended for declared physics majors and those considering majoring or minoring in physics. Prerequisite: PHGN200; Concurrent enrollment in MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Modern Physics I3.0
CSCI250
CSCI250. PYTHON-BASED COMPUTING: BUILDING A SENSOR SYSTEM. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) This course will teach students the skills needed for data collection, analysis, and visualization on a small embedded device (e.g., Raspberry Pi). Students will learn basic Linux, Python, and the programming skills needed to control the hardware and associated sensors. This hands-on course includes a baseline project, four introductory projects (e.g., acoustic, acceleration, magnetic field, optical), and a final Capstone project. The Capstone project will have students create their own application using the techniques learned during the first half of the semester; students will then present their Capstone project through a formal presentation, write-up, and demonstration. We suggest the student take "Introduction to Computer Science" before this course. Co-requisites: MATH213, PHGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Python-Based Computing3.0
PAGN20X
Variable. https://catalog.mines.edu/coursesaz/physact/
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL16.5
SUMMER FIELD SESSION
PHGN384
PHGN384. FIELD SESSION TECHNIQUES IN PHYSICS. 1-6 SEMESTER HR.(S) Introduction to the design and fabrication of engineering physics apparatus. Intensive individual participation in the design of machined system components, vacuum systems, electronics, optics, and application of computer interfacing systems and computational tools. Supplementary lectures on safety, laboratory techniques and professional development. Visits to regional research facilities and industrial plants. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310, PHGN215, CSCI250. 6 semester hours.

Summer Field Session6.0
JUNIOR YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN311
PHGN311. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Demonstration of the unity of diverse topics such as mechanics, quantum mechanics, optics, and electricity and magnetism via the techniques of linear algebra, complex variables, Fourier transforms, and vector calculus. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310, MATH225, MATH332, and CSCI250. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Introduction to Mathematical Physics3.0
PHGN315
PHGN315. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB I. 2.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) Introduction to laboratory measurement techniques as applied to modern physics experiments. Experiments from optics and atomic physics. A writing-intensive course with laboratory and computer design projects based on applications of modern physics. Prerequisite: PHGN300/310, PHGN384. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
Advanced Lab I2.0
PHGN317
PHGN317. SEMICONDUCTOR CIRCUITS- DIGITAL. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Introduction to digital devices used in modern electronics. Topics covered include logic gates, flip-flops, timers, counters, multiplexing, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog devices. Emphasis is on practical circuit design and assembly. Prerequisite: PHGN215 and CSCI250. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Digital Circuits3.0
PHGN350
PHGN350. INTERMEDIATE MECHANICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Begins with an intermediate treatment of Newtonian mechanics and continues through an introduction to Hamilton's principle and Hamiltonian and Lagrangian dynamics. Includes systems of particles, linear and driven oscillators, motion under a central force, two-particle collisions and scattering, motion in non-inertial reference frames and dynamics of rigid bodies.Prerequisite:PHGN200. Corequisite: PHGN311. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
Intermediate Mechanics4.0
HASS Elective I3.0
TOTAL15.0
JUNIOR YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN320
PHGN320. MODERN PHYSICS II: BASICS OF QUANTUM MECHANICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Introduction to the Schroedinger theory of quantum mechanics. Topics include Schroedinger's equation, quantum theory of measurement, the uncertainty principle, eigenfunctions and energy spectra, anular momentum, perturbation theory, and the treatment of identical particles. Example applications taken from atomic, molecular, solid state or nuclear systems. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310 and PHGN311. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
Modern Physics II4.0
PHGN326
PHGN326. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB II. 2.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN315. A writing-intensive course which expands laboratory experiments to include nuclear and solid state physics. Prerequisite: PHGN315. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
Advanced Lab II2.0
PHGN341
PHGN341. THERMAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) An introduction to statistical physics from the quantum mechanical point of view. The microcanonical and canonical ensembles. Heat, work and the laws of thermodynamics. Thermodynamic potentials; Maxwell relations; phase transformations. Elementary kinetic theory. An introduction to quantum statistics. Prerequisite: CHGN122 or CHGN125 and PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Thermal Physics3.0
PHGN361
PHGN361. INTERMEDIATE ELECTROMAGNETISM. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Theory and application of the following: static electric and magnetic fields in free space, dielectric materials, and magnetic materials; steady currents; scalar and vector potentials; Gauss' law and Laplace's equation applied to boundary value problems; Ampere's and Faraday's laws. Prerequisite: PHGN200 and PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Intermediate Electromagnetism3.0
EBGN201
EBGN201. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II,S) Introduction to microeconomics and macroeconomics. This course focuses on applying the economic way of thinking and basic tools of economic analysis. Economic effects of public policies. Analysis of markets for goods, services and resources. Tools of cost-benefit analysis. Measures of overall economic activity. Determinants of economic growth. Monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisites: None. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Principles of Economics3.0
TOTAL15.0
SENIOR YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN471
PHGN471. SENIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES I. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) The first of a two semester sequence covering the principles of project design. Class sessions cover effective team organization, project planning, time management, literature research methods, record keeping, fundamentals of technical writing, professional ethics, project funding and intellectual property. Prerequisites: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisites: PHGN481 or PHGN491. 1 hour lecture in 7 class sessions; 0.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Principles0.5
PHGN481 △√
PHGN481. SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE. 2.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) The first of a two semester program covering the full spectrum of project design, drawing on all of the student's previous course work. At the beginning of the first semester, the student selects a research project in consultation with the Senior Design Oversight Committee (SDOC) and the Project Mentor. The objectives of the project are given to the student in broad outline form. The student then designs the entire project, including any or all of the following elements as appropriate: literature search, specialized apparatus or algorithms, block-diagram electronics, computer data acquisition and/or analysis, sample materials, and measurement and/or analysis sequences. The course culminates in a formal interim written report. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN471. 6 hour lab; 2.5 semester hours.

Senior Design Practice2.5
PHGN462
PHGN462. ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES AND OPTICAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Solutions to the electromagnetic wave equation are studied, including plane waves, guided waves, refraction, interference, diffraction and polarization; applications in optics; imaging, lasers, resonators and wave guides. Prerequisite: PHGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Electromagnetic Waves and Optical Physics3.0
PHGN440
PHGN440. SOLID STATE PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. An elementary study of the properties of solids including crystalline structure and its determination, lattice vibrations, electrons in metals, and semiconductors. (Graduate students in physics may register only for PHGN440.) Prerequisite: PHGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Solid State Physics3.0
MLGN593
MLGN593. BONDING, STRUCTURE, AND CRYSTALLOGRAPHY. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS.(I) This course will be an overview of condensed matter structure from the atomic scale to the mesoscale. Students will gain a perspective on electronic structure as it relates to bonding, long range order as it relates to crystallography and amorphous structures, and extend these ideas to nanostructure and microstructure. Examples relating to each hierarchy of structure will be stressed, especially as they relate to reactivity, mechanical properties, and electronic and optical properties. Prerequisites: A 300 level or higher course in thermodynamics. 3 semester hours.

Bonding/Structure/Crystallography3.0
HASS Elective II3.0
TOTAL15.0
SENIOR YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN472
PHGN472. SENIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES II. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN471. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN482 or PHGN492. 1 hour lecture in 7 class sessions; 0.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Principles0.5
PHGN482 △√
PHGN482. SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE. 2.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN481. The course culminates in a formal written report and poster. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN472. 6 hour lab; 2.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Practice2.5
PHGN419
PHGN419. PRINCIPLES OF SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Review of the solar resource and components of solar irradiance; principles of photovoltaic devices and photovoltaic system design; photovoltaic electrical energy production and cost analysis of photovoltaic systems relative to fossil fuel alternatives; introduction to concentrated photovoltaic systems and manufacturing methods for wafer-based and thin film photovoltaic panels. Prerequisite: PHGN200 and MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Principles of Solar Energy Systems3.0
MLGN592
MLGN592. ADVANCED MATERIALS KINETICS AND TRANSPORT. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) A broad treatment of homogenous and heterogeneous kinetic transport and reaction processes in the gas, liquid, and solid states, with a specific emphasis on heterogeneous kinetic processes involving gas/solid, liquid/solid, and solid/solid systems. Reaction rate theory, nucleation and growth, and phase transformations will be discussed. A detailed overview of mass, heat, and charge transport in condensed phases is provided including a description of fundamental transport mechanisms, the development of general transport equations, and their application to a number of example systems. Prerequisites: A 300 level or higher course in thermodynamics, introductory college chemistry, electricity and magnetism, differential equations. 3 semester hours.

Advanced Materials Kinetics and Transport3.0
MLGN535
MLGN535. INTERDISCIPLINARY MICROELECTRONICS PROCESSING LABORATORY. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with CBEN435,CBEN535,CHEN435,CHEN535,PHGN435,PHGN535, (II) Application of science and engineering principles to the design, fabrication, and testing of microelectronic devices. Emphasis on specific unit operations and the interrelation among processing steps. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Microelectronics Processing Lab3.0
HASS Elective III3.0
TOTAL15.0
GRAND TOTAL130.5
** The Physics Department recommends taking PHGN310.
*** CSCI101 is only 3 credits. Students taking this course must take at least one additional credit to meet total credit hour requirements.
■ Any flavor of EPICS II is allowed for Physics. EPIC269 is offered only in the Fall.
√ Significant design
△ Honors courses PHGN491/492 may be substituted with the instructor's consent.
◆ Electronic Materials Physics electives. For other Materials Science options, consult advisor.
● Required graduate classes apply toward undergraduate degree.

PDF version

BS Engineering Physics / MS Mechanical Engineering
FRESHMAN YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH111
MATH111. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS111, (I, II, S) First course in the calculus sequence, including elements of plane geometry. Functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and their application. Definite and indefinite integrals; Prerequisite: precalculus. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.
Calculus for Scientists and Engineers I4.0
CHGN121
CHGN121. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II) Study of matter and energy based on atomic structure, correlation of properties of elements with position in periodic chart, chemical bonding, geometry of molecules, phase changes, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, gas laws, and thermochemistry. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-SC1.

Principles of Chemistry I4.0
LAIS100
HASS100. NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES. 4.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with LAIS100, Nature and Human Values will focus on diverse views and critical questions concerning traditional and contemporary issues linking the quality of human life and Nature, and their interdependence. The course will examine various disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches regarding two major questions: 1) How has Nature affected the quality of human life and the formulation of human values and ethics? (2) How have human actions, values, and ethics affected Nature? These issues will use cases and examples taken from across time and cultures. Themes will include but are not limited to population, natural resources, stewardship of the Earth, and the future of human society. This is a writing-intensive course that will provide instruction and practice in expository writing, using the disciplines and perspectives of the Humanities and Social Sciences. 4 hours lecture/seminar; 4 semester hours.

Nature and Human Values4.0
GEGN101 or
GEGN101. EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with SYGN101, (I, II, S) Fundamental concepts concerning the nature, composition and evolution of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere of the earth integrating the basic sciences of chemistry, physics, biology and mathematics. Understanding of anthropological interactions with the natural systems, and related discussions on cycling of energy and mass, global warming, natural hazards, land use, mitigation of environmental problems such as toxic waste disposal, exploitation and conservation of energy, mineral and agricultural resources, proper use of water resources, biodiversity and construction. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

CBEN110 or
CBEN110. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with BELS311,BIOL110, (I, II) Fundamentals of Biology with Laboratory I. This course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of biology and use illustrative examples and laboratory investigations that highlight the interface of biology with engineering. The focus will be on (1) the scientific method; (2) structural, molecular, and energetic basis of cellular activities; (3) mechanisms of storage and transfer of genetic information in biological organisms; (4) a laboratory 'toolbox' that will carry them forward in their laboratory-based courses. This core course in biology will be interdisciplinary in nature and will incorporate the major themes and mission of this school - earth, energy, and the environment. Lecture Hours: 3; Lab Hours: 3; Semester Hours: 4.

CSCI101***
CSCI101. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II) An introductory course to the building blocks of Computer Science. Topics include conventional computer hardware, data representation, the role of operating systems and networks in modern computing, algorithm design, privacy and information security, data science, artificial intelligence, and computer ethics. A popular procedural programming language will be learned by students and programming assignments will explore ideas in algorithm development, optimization, and data manipulation. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Earth and Environmental Systems or
Fundamentals of Biology or
Introduction to Computer Science
4.0
CSM101
CSM101. FRESHMAN SUCCESS SEMINAR. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. FIRST-YEAR ADVISING AND MENTORING PROGRAM is a "college transition" course, taught in small groups. Emphasis is placed on fostering connectedness to CSM, developing an appreciation of the value of a Mines education, and learning the techniques and University resources that will allow freshmen to develop to their fullest potential at CSM. Course Objectives: Become an integrated member of the CSM community; explore, select and connect with an academic major; and develop as a person and a student. 9 meetings during semester; 0.5 semester hours.

Success Seminar0.5
PAGN101
PAGN101. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) A general overview of life fitness basics which includes exposure to educational units of Nutrition, Stress Management, Drug and Alcohol Awareness. Instruction in Fitness units provides the student an opportunity for learning and the beginning basics for a healthy life style. 2 hours lab; 0.5 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL17.0
FRESHMAN YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH112
MATH112. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS112,MATH122, (I, II, S) Vectors, applications and techniques of integration, infinite series, and an introduction to multivariate functions and surfaces. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MATH111. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.

Calculus for Scientists and Engineers II4.0
CHGN122 or 
CHGN122. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II (SC1). 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) Continuation of CHGN121 concentrating on chemical kinetics, gas laws, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and chemical equilibrium (acid- base, solubility, complexation, and redox). Laboratory experiments emphasizing quantitative chemical measurements. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CHGN121. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab, 4 semester hours.
CHGN125
CHGN125. MOLECULAR ENGINEERING & MATERIALS CHEMISTRY. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II) Studies of the interactions of matter and energy in chemical reactions and physical processes. Building on principles from CHGN121, the course systematically explores the relationships between processes, structures and properties, starting from the atomic and molecular level. It provides a framework to apply knowledge of chemical bonding and material properties to engineering design, with an emphasis on the Engineering Grand Challenges and the discovery of new process-structure-property relationships. There is a strong focus on the underlying principles of kinetics and equilibrium, and their general applicability, strongly rooted in the first and second law of thermodynamics. Examples of these principles come primarily from solid-state systems. Laboratory experiments emphasize conceptual understanding of structure-property relationships through both hands-on and computational analysis, reinforced by quantitative chemical measurements. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CHGN121. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
Principles of Chemistry II (CHGN 122) or Molecular Engineering and Materials Chemistry (CHGN 125)4.0
PHGN100
PHGN100. PHYSICS I - MECHANICS. 4.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II,S) A first course in physics covering the basic principles of mechanics using vectors and calculus. The course consists of a fundamental treatment of the concepts and applications of kinematics and dynamics of particles and systems of particles, including Newton's laws, energy and momentum, rotation, oscillations, and waves. Prerequisite: MATH111. Co-requisites: MATH112 or MATH113 or MATH122. 2 hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-SC1.
Physics I Mechanics4.5
EPIC151
EDNS151. INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with EPIC151, (I, II, S) Introduction to Design teaches students how to solve open-ended problems in a hands-on manner using critical thinking and workplace skills. Students work in multidisciplinary teams to learn through doing, with emphasis on defining and diagnosing the problem through a holistic lens of technology, people and culture. Students follow a user-centered design methodology throughout the process, seeking to understand a problem from multiple perspectives before attempting to solve it. Students learn and apply specific skills throughout the semester, including: communication (written, oral, graphical), project management, concept visualization, critical thinking, effective teamwork, as well as building and iterating solutions. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

Design I3.0
PAGN102
PAGN102. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Sections in physical fitness and team sports, relating to personal health and wellness activities. 2 hours lab; 0.5 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL16.0
SOPHOMORE YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH213
MATH213. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) Multivariable calculus, including partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.
Calculus for Scientists and Engineers III4.0
PHGN200
PHGN200. PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS. 4.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) Continuation of PHGN100. Introduction to the fundamental laws and concepts of electricity and magnetism, electromagnetic devices, electromagnetic behavior of materials, applications to simple circuits, electromagnetic radiation, and an introduction to optical phenomena. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or higher in PHGN100, concurrent enrollment in MATH213 or MATH214 or MATH223. 2 hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5 semester hours.
Physics II Electromagnetism and Optics4.5
EPIC269 ■√
EDNS269. EPICS II: ENGINEERING PHYSICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with EPIC269, (I) Design EPICS II builds on the design process introduced in Design EPICS I, and focuses on open-ended problem solving in which students use teamwork to develop computer software as a tool to solve problems related to engineering physics. Students will learn basic programming skills and apply them to projects that relate to current research and applications of physics. Projects are selected to represent real world physics problems wherein creative and critical thinking skills are necessary. These projects often involve computer-based optimization to obtain a solution. Students will learn how to analyze errors in data, and their effects on data interpretation and decision-making. Engineering Physics majors are encouraged to take this course in the sophomore year. It is open to other students on a space-available basis. Prerequisite: EDNS151, EDNS155, EDNS192, or HNRS115. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
EPICS II Engineering Physics3.0
LAIS200
HASS200. GLOBAL STUDIES. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with LAIS200,SYGN200, (I, II, S) Part of the Mines core curriculum, following the first-year requirement of HASS 100 (Nature and Human Values). Modern scientists and engineers operate in an increasingly interconnected world. This course is designed to enhance student capacity to understand, appreciate, and critically analyze the global contexts in which they will live and work. Course material examines the modern world through specific thematic lenses, with an emphasis on the major patterns of cultural, political, and/or environmental change. Students will develop original analysis through comparative empirical research on diverse societies and regions, and will communicate this analysis orally and in writing. Prerequisite: HASS100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Human Systems3.0
CEEN241
CEEN241. STATICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with DCGN241, (I, II, S) Forces, moments, couples, equilibrium, centroids and second moments of areas, volumes and masses, hydrostatics, friction, virtual work. Applications of vector algebra to structures. Prerequisite: PHGN100 and credit or concurrent enrollment in MATH112. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Statics3.0
PAGN20X
Variable. https://catalog.mines.edu/coursesaz/physact/
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL18.0
SOPHOMORE YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH225/
MATH225. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS225,MACS315, (I, II, S) Classical techniques for first and higher order equations and systems of equations. Laplace transforms. Phase-plane and stability analysis of non-linear equations and systems. Applications from physics, mechanics, electrical engineering, and environmental sciences. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
235
MATH235. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS HONORS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS325, (II) Same topics as those covered in MATH225 but with additional material and problems. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Differential Equations3.0
MATH332/
MATH332. LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS332, (I, II) Systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants and eigenvalues. Linear operators. Abstract vector spaces. Applications selected from linear programming, physics, graph theory, and other fields. Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
342
MATH342. HONORS LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS342, (II) Same topics as those covered in MATH332 but with additional material and problems as well as a more rigorous presentation. Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Linear Algebra3.0
PHGN215
PHGN215. ANALOG ELECTRONICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Introduction to analog devices used in modern electronics and basic topics in electrical engineering. Introduction to methods of electronics measurements, particularly the application of oscilloscopes and computer based data acquisition. Topics covered include circuit analysis, electrical power, diodes, transistors (FET and BJT), operational amplifiers, filters, transducers, and integrated circuits. Laboratory experiments in the use of basic electronics for physical measurements. Emphasis is on practical knowledge gained in the laboratory, including prototyping, troubleshooting, and laboratory notebook style. Prerequisite: PHGN200. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

Analog Circuits4.0
PHGN300/
PHGN300. PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS I. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with PHGN310, (I) Our technical world is filled with countless examples of modern physics. This course will discuss some historic experiments that led to the key discoveries, and the basic concepts, theories, and models behind some of our present day technologies. Topics may include special relativity, quantum physics, atomic and molecular physics, solid-state physics, semiconductor theory and devices, nuclear physics, particle physics and cosmology. Prerequisite: PHGN200; Concurrent enrollment in MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
310 **
PHGN310. HONORS PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with PHGN300, (II) The third course in introductory physics with in depth discussion on special relativity, wave-particle duality, the Schroedinger equation, electrons in solids, quantum tunneling, nuclear structure and transmutations. Registration is strongly recommended for declared physics majors and those considering majoring or minoring in physics. Prerequisite: PHGN200; Concurrent enrollment in MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Modern Physics I3.0
CSCI250
CSCI250. PYTHON-BASED COMPUTING: BUILDING A SENSOR SYSTEM. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) This course will teach students the skills needed for data collection, analysis, and visualization on a small embedded device (e.g., Raspberry Pi). Students will learn basic Linux, Python, and the programming skills needed to control the hardware and associated sensors. This hands-on course includes a baseline project, four introductory projects (e.g., acoustic, acceleration, magnetic field, optical), and a final Capstone project. The Capstone project will have students create their own application using the techniques learned during the first half of the semester; students will then present their Capstone project through a formal presentation, write-up, and demonstration. We suggest the student take "Introduction to Computer Science" before this course. Co-requisites: MATH213, PHGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Python-Based Computing3.0
PAGN20X
Variable. https://catalog.mines.edu/coursesaz/physact/
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL16.5
SUMMER FIELD SESSION
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN384
PHGN384. FIELD SESSION TECHNIQUES IN PHYSICS. 1-6 SEMESTER HR.(S) Introduction to the design and fabrication of engineering physics apparatus. Intensive individual participation in the design of machined system components, vacuum systems, electronics, optics, and application of computer interfacing systems and computational tools. Supplementary lectures on safety, laboratory techniques and professional development. Visits to regional research facilities and industrial plants. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310, PHGN215, CSCI250. 6 semester hours.

Summer Field Session6.0
TOTAL6.0
JUNIOR YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN311
PHGN311. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Demonstration of the unity of diverse topics such as mechanics, quantum mechanics, optics, and electricity and magnetism via the techniques of linear algebra, complex variables, Fourier transforms, and vector calculus. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310, MATH225, MATH332, and CSCI250. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Introduction to Mathematical Physics3.0
PHGN315
PHGN315. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB I. 2.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) Introduction to laboratory measurement techniques as applied to modern physics experiments. Experiments from optics and atomic physics. A writing-intensive course with laboratory and computer design projects based on applications of modern physics. Prerequisite: PHGN300/310, PHGN384. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
Advanced Lab I2.0
PHGN317
PHGN317. SEMICONDUCTOR CIRCUITS- DIGITAL. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Introduction to digital devices used in modern electronics. Topics covered include logic gates, flip-flops, timers, counters, multiplexing, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog devices. Emphasis is on practical circuit design and assembly. Prerequisite: PHGN215 and CSCI250. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Digital Circuits3.0
PHGN350
PHGN350. INTERMEDIATE MECHANICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Begins with an intermediate treatment of Newtonian mechanics and continues through an introduction to Hamilton's principle and Hamiltonian and Lagrangian dynamics. Includes systems of particles, linear and driven oscillators, motion under a central force, two-particle collisions and scattering, motion in non-inertial reference frames and dynamics of rigid bodies.Prerequisite:PHGN200. Corequisite: PHGN311. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
Intermediate Mechanics4.0
HASS Elective I3.0
TOTAL15.0
JUNIOR YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN320
PHGN320. MODERN PHYSICS II: BASICS OF QUANTUM MECHANICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Introduction to the Schroedinger theory of quantum mechanics. Topics include Schroedinger's equation, quantum theory of measurement, the uncertainty principle, eigenfunctions and energy spectra, anular momentum, perturbation theory, and the treatment of identical particles. Example applications taken from atomic, molecular, solid state or nuclear systems. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310 and PHGN311. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
Modern Physics II4.0
PHGN326
PHGN326. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB II. 2.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN315. A writing-intensive course which expands laboratory experiments to include nuclear and solid state physics. Prerequisite: PHGN315. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
Advanced Lab II2.0
PHGN341
PHGN341. THERMAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) An introduction to statistical physics from the quantum mechanical point of view. The microcanonical and canonical ensembles. Heat, work and the laws of thermodynamics. Thermodynamic potentials; Maxwell relations; phase transformations. Elementary kinetic theory. An introduction to quantum statistics. Prerequisite: CHGN122 or CHGN125 and PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Thermal Physics3.0
PHGN361
PHGN361. INTERMEDIATE ELECTROMAGNETISM. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Theory and application of the following: static electric and magnetic fields in free space, dielectric materials, and magnetic materials; steady currents; scalar and vector potentials; Gauss' law and Laplace's equation applied to boundary value problems; Ampere's and Faraday's laws. Prerequisite: PHGN200 and PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Intermediate Electromagnetism3.0
CEEN311
CEEN311. MECHANICS OF MATERIALS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with EGGN320, (I, II, S) Fundamentals of stresses and strains, material properties including axial, torsional, bending, and combined loadings. Stress at a point; stress transformations and Mohr's circle for stress; beam deflections, thin-wall pressure vessels, columns and buckling, and stress concentrations. May not also receive credit for MEGN312. Prerequisite: CEEN241. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Mechanics of Materials3.0
TOTAL15.0
SENIOR YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN471
PHGN471. SENIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES I. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) The first of a two semester sequence covering the principles of project design. Class sessions cover effective team organization, project planning, time management, literature research methods, record keeping, fundamentals of technical writing, professional ethics, project funding and intellectual property. Prerequisites: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisites: PHGN481 or PHGN491. 1 hour lecture in 7 class sessions; 0.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Principles0.5
PHGN481 △√
PHGN481. SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE. 2.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) The first of a two semester program covering the full spectrum of project design, drawing on all of the student's previous course work. At the beginning of the first semester, the student selects a research project in consultation with the Senior Design Oversight Committee (SDOC) and the Project Mentor. The objectives of the project are given to the student in broad outline form. The student then designs the entire project, including any or all of the following elements as appropriate: literature search, specialized apparatus or algorithms, block-diagram electronics, computer data acquisition and/or analysis, sample materials, and measurement and/or analysis sequences. The course culminates in a formal interim written report. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN471. 6 hour lab; 2.5 semester hours.

Senior Design Practice2.5
PHGN462
PHGN462. ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES AND OPTICAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Solutions to the electromagnetic wave equation are studied, including plane waves, guided waves, refraction, interference, diffraction and polarization; applications in optics; imaging, lasers, resonators and wave guides. Prerequisite: PHGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Electromagnetic Waves and Optical Physics3.0
HASS Elective II3.0
MEGN351
MEGN351. FLUID MECHANICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with EGGN351, (I, II) Fluid properties, fluid statics, control-volume analysis, Bernoulli equation, differential analysis and Navier-Stokes equations, dimensional analysis, internal flow, external flow, open-channel flow, and turbomachinery. May not also receive credit for CEEN310 or PEGN251. Prerequisite: CEEN241 (C- or better) or MNGN317 (C- or better). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Fluid Mechanics3.0
EENG388 √, Track 1, or
EENG310. INFORMATION SYSTEMS SCIENCE I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with EENG388,EGGN388, (I, II) The interpretation, representation and analysis of time-varying phenomena as signals which convey information and noise; applications are drawn from filtering, audio and image processing, and communications. Topics include convolution, Fourier series and transforms, sampling and discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals, modulation, and z-transforms. Prerequisites: (EENG281 or EENG282 or PHGN215) and MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 1 hour recitation, 4 semester hours.
MEGN424 √, Track 2.
MEGN424. COMPUTER AIDED ENGINEERING. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with EGGN413, (I, II, S) This course introduces the student to the concept of computer-aided engineering. The major objective is to provide the student with the necessary background to use the computer as a tool for engineering analysis and design. The Finite Element Analysis (FEA) method and associated computational engineering software have become significant tools in engineering analysis and design. This course is directed to learning the concepts of FEA and its application to civil and mechanical engineering analysis and design. Note that critical evaluation of the results of a FEA using classical methods (from statics and mechanics of materials) and engineering judgment is employed throughout the course. Prerequisite: MEGN312 (C- or better) or CEEN311 (C- or better). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Information Systems Science (EENG 388) or Computer-Aided Engineering (MEGN 424)3.0
TOTAL15.0
SENIOR YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN472
PHGN472. SENIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES II. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN471. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN482 or PHGN492. 1 hour lecture in 7 class sessions; 0.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Principles0.5
PHGN482 △√
PHGN482. SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE. 2.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN481. The course culminates in a formal written report and poster. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN472. 6 hour lab; 2.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Practice2.5
MEGN471
MEGN471. HEAT TRANSFER. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with EGGN471, (I, II) Engineering approach to conduction, convection, and radiation, including steadystate conduction, nonsteady-state conduction, internal heat generation conduction in one, two, and three dimensions, and combined conduction and convection. Free and forced convection including laminar and turbulent flow, internal and external flow. Radiation of black and grey surfaces, shape factors and electrical equivalence. Prerequisites: MEGN351 (C- or better), MEGN361 (C- or better), and MATH307 (C- or better). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Heat Transfer3.0
HASS Elective III3.0
EENG307 √, Track 1, or
EENG307. INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK CONTROL SYSTEMS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with EGGN307,EGGN407, (I, II) System modeling through an energy flow approach is presented, with examples from linear electrical, mechanical, fluid and/or thermal systems. Analysis of system response in both the time domain and frequency domain is discussed in detail. Feedback control design techniques, including PID, are analyzed using both analytical and computational methods. Prerequisites: EENG281 or EENG282 or PHGN215, and MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MEGN481 √, Track 2.
MEGN481. MACHINE DESIGN. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with EGGN411, (I, II) In this course, students develop their knowledge of machine components and materials for the purpose of effective and efficient mechanical design. Emphasis is placed on developing analytical methods and tools that aid the decision making process. The course focuses on determination of stress, strain, and deflection for static, static multiaxial, impact, dynamic, and dynamic multiaxial loading. Students will learn about fatigue failure in mechanical design and calculate how long mechanical components are expected to last. Specific machine components covered include shafts, springs, gears, fasteners, and bearings. Prerequisites: MEGN315 (C- or better) or PHGN350 (C- or better), and MEGN424 (C- or better). Corequisite: MEGN489. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Introduction to Feedback Control Systems or Machine Design3.0
EBGN201
EBGN201. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II,S) Introduction to microeconomics and macroeconomics. This course focuses on applying the economic way of thinking and basic tools of economic analysis. Economic effects of public policies. Analysis of markets for goods, services and resources. Tools of cost-benefit analysis. Measures of overall economic activity. Determinants of economic growth. Monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisites: None. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Principles of Economics3.0
TOTAL15.0
GRAND TOTAL133.5
** The Physics Department recommends taking PHGN310.
*** CSCI101 is only 3 credits. Students taking this course must take at least one additional credit to meet total credit hour requirements.
■ Any flavor of EPICS II is allowed for Physics. EPIC269 is offered only in the Fall.
√ Significant design
△ Honors courses PHGN491/492 may be substituted with the instructor's consent.
⬡ Add 1.0 hour for Track 2.

PDF version

BS Engineering Physics / MS Nuclear Engineering
FRESHMAN YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH111
MATH111. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS111, (I, II, S) First course in the calculus sequence, including elements of plane geometry. Functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and their application. Definite and indefinite integrals; Prerequisite: precalculus. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.
Calculus for Scientists and Engineers I4.0
CHGN121
CHGN121. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II) Study of matter and energy based on atomic structure, correlation of properties of elements with position in periodic chart, chemical bonding, geometry of molecules, phase changes, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, gas laws, and thermochemistry. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-SC1.

Principles of Chemistry I4.0
LAIS100
HASS100. NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES. 4.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with LAIS100, Nature and Human Values will focus on diverse views and critical questions concerning traditional and contemporary issues linking the quality of human life and Nature, and their interdependence. The course will examine various disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches regarding two major questions: 1) How has Nature affected the quality of human life and the formulation of human values and ethics? (2) How have human actions, values, and ethics affected Nature? These issues will use cases and examples taken from across time and cultures. Themes will include but are not limited to population, natural resources, stewardship of the Earth, and the future of human society. This is a writing-intensive course that will provide instruction and practice in expository writing, using the disciplines and perspectives of the Humanities and Social Sciences. 4 hours lecture/seminar; 4 semester hours.
Nature and Human Values4.0
GEGN101 or
GEGN101. EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with SYGN101, (I, II, S) Fundamental concepts concerning the nature, composition and evolution of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere of the earth integrating the basic sciences of chemistry, physics, biology and mathematics. Understanding of anthropological interactions with the natural systems, and related discussions on cycling of energy and mass, global warming, natural hazards, land use, mitigation of environmental problems such as toxic waste disposal, exploitation and conservation of energy, mineral and agricultural resources, proper use of water resources, biodiversity and construction. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

CBEN110 or
CBEN110. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY I. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with BELS311,BIOL110, (I, II) Fundamentals of Biology with Laboratory I. This course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of biology and use illustrative examples and laboratory investigations that highlight the interface of biology with engineering. The focus will be on (1) the scientific method; (2) structural, molecular, and energetic basis of cellular activities; (3) mechanisms of storage and transfer of genetic information in biological organisms; (4) a laboratory 'toolbox' that will carry them forward in their laboratory-based courses. This core course in biology will be interdisciplinary in nature and will incorporate the major themes and mission of this school - earth, energy, and the environment. Lecture Hours: 3; Lab Hours: 3; Semester Hours: 4.

CSCI101***
CSCI101. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II) An introductory course to the building blocks of Computer Science. Topics include conventional computer hardware, data representation, the role of operating systems and networks in modern computing, algorithm design, privacy and information security, data science, artificial intelligence, and computer ethics. A popular procedural programming language will be learned by students and programming assignments will explore ideas in algorithm development, optimization, and data manipulation. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Earth and Environmental Systems or
Fundamentals of Biology or
Introduction to Computer Science
4.0
CSM101
CSM101. FRESHMAN SUCCESS SEMINAR. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. FIRST-YEAR ADVISING AND MENTORING PROGRAM is a "college transition" course, taught in small groups. Emphasis is placed on fostering connectedness to CSM, developing an appreciation of the value of a Mines education, and learning the techniques and University resources that will allow freshmen to develop to their fullest potential at CSM. Course Objectives: Become an integrated member of the CSM community; explore, select and connect with an academic major; and develop as a person and a student. 9 meetings during semester; 0.5 semester hours.

Success Seminar0.5
PAGN101
PAGN101. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) A general overview of life fitness basics which includes exposure to educational units of Nutrition, Stress Management, Drug and Alcohol Awareness. Instruction in Fitness units provides the student an opportunity for learning and the beginning basics for a healthy life style. 2 hours lab; 0.5 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL17.0
FRESHMAN YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH112
MATH112. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS112,MATH122, (I, II, S) Vectors, applications and techniques of integration, infinite series, and an introduction to multivariate functions and surfaces. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MATH111. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.

Calculus for Scientists and Engineers II4.0
CHGN125*
CHGN125. MOLECULAR ENGINEERING & MATERIALS CHEMISTRY. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II) Studies of the interactions of matter and energy in chemical reactions and physical processes. Building on principles from CHGN121, the course systematically explores the relationships between processes, structures and properties, starting from the atomic and molecular level. It provides a framework to apply knowledge of chemical bonding and material properties to engineering design, with an emphasis on the Engineering Grand Challenges and the discovery of new process-structure-property relationships. There is a strong focus on the underlying principles of kinetics and equilibrium, and their general applicability, strongly rooted in the first and second law of thermodynamics. Examples of these principles come primarily from solid-state systems. Laboratory experiments emphasize conceptual understanding of structure-property relationships through both hands-on and computational analysis, reinforced by quantitative chemical measurements. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CHGN121. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
Molecular Engineering and Materials Chemistry 4.0
PHGN100
PHGN100. PHYSICS I - MECHANICS. 4.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II,S) A first course in physics covering the basic principles of mechanics using vectors and calculus. The course consists of a fundamental treatment of the concepts and applications of kinematics and dynamics of particles and systems of particles, including Newton's laws, energy and momentum, rotation, oscillations, and waves. Prerequisite: MATH111. Co-requisites: MATH112 or MATH113 or MATH122. 2 hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-SC1.
Physics I Mechanics4.5
EPIC151
EDNS151. INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with EPIC151, (I, II, S) Introduction to Design teaches students how to solve open-ended problems in a hands-on manner using critical thinking and workplace skills. Students work in multidisciplinary teams to learn through doing, with emphasis on defining and diagnosing the problem through a holistic lens of technology, people and culture. Students follow a user-centered design methodology throughout the process, seeking to understand a problem from multiple perspectives before attempting to solve it. Students learn and apply specific skills throughout the semester, including: communication (written, oral, graphical), project management, concept visualization, critical thinking, effective teamwork, as well as building and iterating solutions. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

Design I3.0
PAGN102
PAGN102. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Sections in physical fitness and team sports, relating to personal health and wellness activities. 2 hours lab; 0.5 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL16.0
SOPHOMORE YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH213
MATH213. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) Multivariable calculus, including partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.
Calculus for Scientists and Engineers III4.0
PHGN200
PHGN200. PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS. 4.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) Continuation of PHGN100. Introduction to the fundamental laws and concepts of electricity and magnetism, electromagnetic devices, electromagnetic behavior of materials, applications to simple circuits, electromagnetic radiation, and an introduction to optical phenomena. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or higher in PHGN100, concurrent enrollment in MATH213 or MATH214 or MATH223. 2 hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5 semester hours.
Physics II Electromagnetism and Optics4.5
EPIC269 ■√
EDNS269. EPICS II: ENGINEERING PHYSICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with EPIC269, (I) Design EPICS II builds on the design process introduced in Design EPICS I, and focuses on open-ended problem solving in which students use teamwork to develop computer software as a tool to solve problems related to engineering physics. Students will learn basic programming skills and apply them to projects that relate to current research and applications of physics. Projects are selected to represent real world physics problems wherein creative and critical thinking skills are necessary. These projects often involve computer-based optimization to obtain a solution. Students will learn how to analyze errors in data, and their effects on data interpretation and decision-making. Engineering Physics majors are encouraged to take this course in the sophomore year. It is open to other students on a space-available basis. Prerequisite: EDNS151, EDNS155, EDNS192, or HNRS115. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
EPICS II Engineering Physics3.0
LAIS200
HASS200. GLOBAL STUDIES. 3.0 Semester Hrs. Equivalent with LAIS200,SYGN200, (I, II, S) Part of the Mines core curriculum, following the first-year requirement of HASS 100 (Nature and Human Values). Modern scientists and engineers operate in an increasingly interconnected world. This course is designed to enhance student capacity to understand, appreciate, and critically analyze the global contexts in which they will live and work. Course material examines the modern world through specific thematic lenses, with an emphasis on the major patterns of cultural, political, and/or environmental change. Students will develop original analysis through comparative empirical research on diverse societies and regions, and will communicate this analysis orally and in writing. Prerequisite: HASS100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Human Systems3.0
CEEN241
CEEN241. STATICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with DCGN241, (I, II, S) Forces, moments, couples, equilibrium, centroids and second moments of areas, volumes and masses, hydrostatics, friction, virtual work. Applications of vector algebra to structures. Prerequisite: PHGN100 and credit or concurrent enrollment in MATH112. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Statics3.0
PAGN20X
Variable. https://catalog.mines.edu/coursesaz/physact/
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL18.0
SOPHOMORE YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
MATH225/
MATH225. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS225,MACS315, (I, II, S) Classical techniques for first and higher order equations and systems of equations. Laplace transforms. Phase-plane and stability analysis of non-linear equations and systems. Applications from physics, mechanics, electrical engineering, and environmental sciences. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
235
MATH235. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS HONORS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS325, (II) Same topics as those covered in MATH225 but with additional material and problems. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MATH112 or MATH122 or Concurrent Enrollment in MATH113. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Differential Equations3.0
MATH332/
MATH332. LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS332, (I, II) Systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants and eigenvalues. Linear operators. Abstract vector spaces. Applications selected from linear programming, physics, graph theory, and other fields. Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
342
MATH342. HONORS LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with MACS342, (II) Same topics as those covered in MATH332 but with additional material and problems as well as a more rigorous presentation. Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Linear Algebra3.0
PHGN 215
PHGN215. ANALOG ELECTRONICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Introduction to analog devices used in modern electronics and basic topics in electrical engineering. Introduction to methods of electronics measurements, particularly the application of oscilloscopes and computer based data acquisition. Topics covered include circuit analysis, electrical power, diodes, transistors (FET and BJT), operational amplifiers, filters, transducers, and integrated circuits. Laboratory experiments in the use of basic electronics for physical measurements. Emphasis is on practical knowledge gained in the laboratory, including prototyping, troubleshooting, and laboratory notebook style. Prerequisite: PHGN200. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

Analog Circuits4.0
PHGN300/
PHGN300. PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS I. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with PHGN310, (I) Our technical world is filled with countless examples of modern physics. This course will discuss some historic experiments that led to the key discoveries, and the basic concepts, theories, and models behind some of our present day technologies. Topics may include special relativity, quantum physics, atomic and molecular physics, solid-state physics, semiconductor theory and devices, nuclear physics, particle physics and cosmology. Prerequisite: PHGN200; Concurrent enrollment in MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
310 **
PHGN310. HONORS PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with PHGN300, (II) The third course in introductory physics with in depth discussion on special relativity, wave-particle duality, the Schroedinger equation, electrons in solids, quantum tunneling, nuclear structure and transmutations. Registration is strongly recommended for declared physics majors and those considering majoring or minoring in physics. Prerequisite: PHGN200; Concurrent enrollment in MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Modern Physics I3.0
CSCI250
CSCI250. PYTHON-BASED COMPUTING: BUILDING A SENSOR SYSTEM. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I, II, S) This course will teach students the skills needed for data collection, analysis, and visualization on a small embedded device (e.g., Raspberry Pi). Students will learn basic Linux, Python, and the programming skills needed to control the hardware and associated sensors. This hands-on course includes a baseline project, four introductory projects (e.g., acoustic, acceleration, magnetic field, optical), and a final Capstone project. The Capstone project will have students create their own application using the techniques learned during the first half of the semester; students will then present their Capstone project through a formal presentation, write-up, and demonstration. We suggest the student take "Introduction to Computer Science" before this course. Co-requisites: MATH213, PHGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Python-Based Computing3.0
PAGN20X
Variable. https://catalog.mines.edu/coursesaz/physact/
Physical Education0.5
TOTAL16.5
SUMMER FIELD SESSION
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN384
PHGN384. FIELD SESSION TECHNIQUES IN PHYSICS. 1-6 SEMESTER HR.(S) Introduction to the design and fabrication of engineering physics apparatus. Intensive individual participation in the design of machined system components, vacuum systems, electronics, optics, and application of computer interfacing systems and computational tools. Supplementary lectures on safety, laboratory techniques and professional development. Visits to regional research facilities and industrial plants. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310, PHGN215, CSCI250. 6 semester hours.

Summer Field Session6.0
TOTAL6.0
JUNIOR YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN311
PHGN311. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Demonstration of the unity of diverse topics such as mechanics, quantum mechanics, optics, and electricity and magnetism via the techniques of linear algebra, complex variables, Fourier transforms, and vector calculus. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310, MATH225, MATH332, and CSCI250. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Introduction to Mathematical Physics3.0
PHGN315
PHGN315. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB I. 2.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) Introduction to laboratory measurement techniques as applied to modern physics experiments. Experiments from optics and atomic physics. A writing-intensive course with laboratory and computer design projects based on applications of modern physics. Prerequisite: PHGN300/310, PHGN384. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
Advanced Lab I2.0
PHGN317
PHGN317. SEMICONDUCTOR CIRCUITS- DIGITAL. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Introduction to digital devices used in modern electronics. Topics covered include logic gates, flip-flops, timers, counters, multiplexing, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog devices. Emphasis is on practical circuit design and assembly. Prerequisite: PHGN215 and CSCI250. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Digital Circuits3.0
PHGN350
PHGN350. INTERMEDIATE MECHANICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Begins with an intermediate treatment of Newtonian mechanics and continues through an introduction to Hamilton's principle and Hamiltonian and Lagrangian dynamics. Includes systems of particles, linear and driven oscillators, motion under a central force, two-particle collisions and scattering, motion in non-inertial reference frames and dynamics of rigid bodies.Prerequisite:PHGN200. Corequisite: PHGN311. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
Intermediate Mechanics4.0
HASS Elective I3.0
TOTAL15.0
JUNIOR YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN320
PHGN320. MODERN PHYSICS II: BASICS OF QUANTUM MECHANICS. 4.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Introduction to the Schroedinger theory of quantum mechanics. Topics include Schroedinger's equation, quantum theory of measurement, the uncertainty principle, eigenfunctions and energy spectra, anular momentum, perturbation theory, and the treatment of identical particles. Example applications taken from atomic, molecular, solid state or nuclear systems. Prerequisites: PHGN300 or PHGN310 and PHGN311. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
Modern Physics II4.0
PHGN326
PHGN326. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB II. 2.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN315. A writing-intensive course which expands laboratory experiments to include nuclear and solid state physics. Prerequisite: PHGN315. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
Advanced Lab II2.0
PHGN341
PHGN341. THERMAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) An introduction to statistical physics from the quantum mechanical point of view. The microcanonical and canonical ensembles. Heat, work and the laws of thermodynamics. Thermodynamic potentials; Maxwell relations; phase transformations. Elementary kinetic theory. An introduction to quantum statistics. Prerequisite: CHGN122 or CHGN125 and PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Thermal Physics3.0
PHGN361
PHGN361. INTERMEDIATE ELECTROMAGNETISM. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Theory and application of the following: static electric and magnetic fields in free space, dielectric materials, and magnetic materials; steady currents; scalar and vector potentials; Gauss' law and Laplace's equation applied to boundary value problems; Ampere's and Faraday's laws. Prerequisite: PHGN200 and PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Intermediate Electromagnetism3.0
MEGN351
MEGN351. FLUID MECHANICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with EGGN351, (I, II) Fluid properties, fluid statics, control-volume analysis, Bernoulli equation, differential analysis and Navier-Stokes equations, dimensional analysis, internal flow, external flow, open-channel flow, and turbomachinery. May not also receive credit for CEEN310 or PEGN251. Prerequisite: CEEN241 (C- or better) or MNGN317 (C- or better). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Fluid Mechanics3.0
TOTAL15.0
SENIOR YEAR, FALL SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN471
PHGN471. SENIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES I. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) The first of a two semester sequence covering the principles of project design. Class sessions cover effective team organization, project planning, time management, literature research methods, record keeping, fundamentals of technical writing, professional ethics, project funding and intellectual property. Prerequisites: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisites: PHGN481 or PHGN491. 1 hour lecture in 7 class sessions; 0.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Principles0.5
PHGN481 △ √
PHGN481. SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE. 2.5 SEMESTER HRS. (I) (WI) The first of a two semester program covering the full spectrum of project design, drawing on all of the student's previous course work. At the beginning of the first semester, the student selects a research project in consultation with the Senior Design Oversight Committee (SDOC) and the Project Mentor. The objectives of the project are given to the student in broad outline form. The student then designs the entire project, including any or all of the following elements as appropriate: literature search, specialized apparatus or algorithms, block-diagram electronics, computer data acquisition and/or analysis, sample materials, and measurement and/or analysis sequences. The course culminates in a formal interim written report. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN471. 6 hour lab; 2.5 semester hours.

Senior Design Practice2.5
PHGN462
PHGN462. ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES AND OPTICAL PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I) Solutions to the electromagnetic wave equation are studied, including plane waves, guided waves, refraction, interference, diffraction and polarization; applications in optics; imaging, lasers, resonators and wave guides. Prerequisite: PHGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Electromagnetic Waves and Optical Physics3.0
PHGN422
PHGN422. NUCLEAR PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Introduction to subatomic (particle and nuclear) phenomena. Characterization and systematics of particle and nuclear states; symmetries; introduction and systematics of the electromagnetic, weak, and strong interactions; systematics of radioactivity; liquid drop and shell models; nuclear technology. Prerequisite: PHGN300/310. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Nuclear Physics3.0
MEGN471
MEGN471. HEAT TRANSFER. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. Equivalent with EGGN471, (I, II) Engineering approach to conduction, convection, and radiation, including steadystate conduction, nonsteady-state conduction, internal heat generation conduction in one, two, and three dimensions, and combined conduction and convection. Free and forced convection including laminar and turbulent flow, internal and external flow. Radiation of black and grey surfaces, shape factors and electrical equivalence. Prerequisites: MEGN351 (C- or better), MEGN361 (C- or better), and MATH307 (C- or better). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Heat Transfer3.0
HASS Elective II3.0
TOTAL15.0
SENIOR YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER
Course NumberTitleHours
PHGN472
PHGN472. SENIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES II. 0.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN471. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN482 or PHGN492. 1 hour lecture in 7 class sessions; 0.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Principles0.5
PHGN482 △√
PHGN482. SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE. 2.5 SEMESTER HRS. (II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN481. The course culminates in a formal written report and poster. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN472. 6 hour lab; 2.5 semester hours.
Senior Design Practice2.5
NUGN510
NUGN510. INTRODUCTION TO NUCLEAR REACTOR PHYSICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Bridges the gap between courses in fundamental nuclear physics and the neutronic design and analysis of nuclear reactors. Review of neutron energetics and reactions; nuclear cross sections; neutron induced fission; neutron life cycle, multiplication, and criticality; nuclear reactor kinetics and control; the diffusion approximation for neutron transport; simple reactor geometries and compositions; modeling and simulation of reactors. Prerequisite: PHGN422. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Introduction to Nuclear Reactor Physics3.0
NUGN520
NUGN520. INTRODUCTION TO NUCLEAR REACTOR THERMAL-HYDRAULICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (II) Bridges the gap between fundamental courses in thermodynamics, fluid flow, and heat transer and the thermal-hydraulic design and analysis of nuclear reactors. Provides a comprehensive introduction to the thermal-hydraulics of each of the major classes of nuclear reactors. Introduces the major thermal-hydraulic computational tools, passively safe reactor design, thermal-hydraulic transient analysis, and severe nuclear reactor accident analysis.

Introduction to Nuclear Reactor Thermal Hydraulics3.0
HASS Elective III3.0
EBGN201
EBGN201. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS. 3.0 SEMESTER HRS. (I,II,S) Introduction to microeconomics and macroeconomics. This course focuses on applying the economic way of thinking and basic tools of economic analysis. Economic effects of public policies. Analysis of markets for goods, services and resources. Tools of cost-benefit analysis. Measures of overall economic activity. Determinants of economic growth. Monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisites: None. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Principles of Economics3.0
TOTAL15.0
GRAND TOTAL133.5
* Nuclear Engineering Combined students should take the CHGN122/CHGN209 sequence.
** The Physics Department recommends taking PHGN310.
*** CSCI101 is only 3 credits. Students taking this course must take at least one additional credit to meet total credit hour requirements.
■ Any flavor of EPICS II is allowed for Physics. EPIC269 is offered only in the Fall.
√ Significant design
△ Honors courses PHGN491/492 may be substituted with the instructor's consent.

PDFversion